I am most truly sorry / you are most greatly appreciated

kuevix

New Member
spanish - spain
Hello!!

These traductions sound a little bit weird to me:

yo lo siento (lo que más) verdaderamente, / tú eres el más grandemente apreciado, valorado (musician e.g.).

Yeah...really quite weird,

I can´t understand the use of "most" in these expressions, in addition, it exists any grammatical rule for this?

can you help me?? :)

thanks!
 
  • Mr.Dent

    Senior Member
    English American
    Hello!!

    These translations sound a little bit weird to me:

    yo lo siento (lo que más) verdaderamente, / tú eres el más grandemente apreciado, valorado (musician e.g.).

    Yeah...really quite weird,

    I can´t understand the use of "most" in these expressions. In addition, does any grammatical rule for these exist?

    can you help me?? :)

    thanks!
    In these cases, I believe that you could translate 'most' as 'muy' instead of más'. Think of the sentences as though they read:
    I am truly very sorry. You are very greatly appreciated.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    most
    adv. Superlative of much.
    1. In or to the highest degree or extent. Used with many adjectives and adverbs to form the superlative degree: most honest; most impatiently.
    2. Very: a most impressive piece of writing.

    Number 2 is the meaning in your context.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Hello!!

    These traductions sound a little bit weird to me:

    yo lo siento (lo que más) verdaderamente, / tú eres el más grandemente apreciado, valorado (musician e.g.).

    Yeah...really quite weird,

    I can´t understand the use of "most" in these expressions, in addition, it exists any grammatical rule for this?

    can you help me?? :)

    thanks!
    ¿Qué tal "Lo siento más verdaderamente", "Eres apreciado más grandemente"?
     

    broken tree house

    Senior Member
    mexican spanish
    Hello!!

    These traductions sound a little bit weird to me:

    yo lo siento (lo que más) verdaderamente, / tú eres el más grandemente apreciado, valorado (musician e.g.).

    Yeah...really quite weird,

    I can´t understand the use of "most" in these expressions, in addition, it exists any grammatical rule for this?

    can you help me?? :)

    thanks!
    Siendo "most" un superlativo en el idioma inglés, aquí es donde entran los superlativos "ísimo, ísima" en español.

    Estoy verdaderamente apenadísimo. or En verdad lo lamento muchísimo.
    Eres extremadamente apreciadísimo.
     

    kuevix

    New Member
    spanish - spain
    I think some of you are right when you advise me to replace "very" with "muy", and the use of "-isimo" helps a lot as well,

    thanks to all of you guys!!
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Entiendo most truly y most greatly como superlativos: "1. In or to the highest degree or extent."

    "I am very truly sorry" dice poco más que "I am truly sorry", "I am more truly sorry than you know" compara con algo específico, y "I am most truly sorry" expresa un extremo.

    Tengo dudas con expresar en español lo que quiero decir.

    I am most truly sorry.
    = "No one can ever be more truly sorry than I am."
    = "I am to the highest degree truly sorry."

    Mis intentos:

    Lo siento más verdaderamente.
    Lo siento lo más verdaderamente.
    Lo siento de lo más verdaderamente.


    You are most greatly appreciated.
    = "No one can ever be more greatly appreciated than you are."
    = "You are to the highest degree greatly appreciated."

    Mis intentos:

    Te agradecemos más grandemente.
    Te agradecemos lo más grandemente.
    Te agradecemos de lo más grandemente.
     
    Last edited:

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Entiendo most truly y most greatly como superlativos: "1. In or to the highest degree or extent."
    No, the meaning is 2., "very," as I mentioned above. The example given in the dictionary citation I included is "a most impressive piece of writing," and you can see that it is not a superlative (not "the most"), and "most" here just means "very." Therefore, "I am most truly sorry" does not mean that I am more sorry than anyone else, or more than I have ever been before, and instead the "most" is merely making the degree higher (not highest).
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    No, the meaning is 2., "very," as I mentioned above. The example given in the dictionary citation I included is "a most impressive piece of writing," and you can see that it is not a superlative (not "the most"), and "most" here just means "very." Therefore, "I am most truly sorry" does not mean that I am more sorry than anyone else, or more than I have ever been before, and instead the "most" is merely making the degree higher (not highest).
    I did not mean to say that there cannot be a tie for the most truly sorry or that no one would say the sentence with meaning 2.

    But I respectfully disagree with the idea that only meaning 2 is possible for most truly sorry in the sentence in question.

    I insist that the way I read the sentences in question is legitimate, but you are free to interpret "most truly sorry" as "very truly sorry" or "very very sorry" or "apologetic but not really sorry" if you want. (We live in a world where some people are prone to understatement, some to overstatement, and some to out and out lying; and what constitutes a "real" apology is controversial, to say the least.)

    My question, which I think deserves an answer, is whether the superlative meaning that I see in these sentences is translatable to Spanish as a superlative with más.
     
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