I am not interested in the hotel, but its swimming pool.

monster123

Senior Member
Hi everyone,
Suppose, there is a hotel which has a swimming pool as its facility.
I am not interested in staying in the hotel, but wouldn't mind visiting the swimming pool.
Could you tell me if the following sentence is worded correctly and reflects my thought.
e.g.
I am not interested in the hotel, but its swimming pool.
 
  • Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    I am not interested in the hotel, but its swimming pool. :tick:
    I am interested not in the hotel, but its swimming pool. :tick:
    I am interested not in the hotel, but in its swimming pool. :tick:

    Hi monster, your sentence is ok. It has a couple of features (position of "not", and omission of "in" in the second clause) which mark it as more conversational than the other two versions I give above. These two (second and third versions) are a little more formal, but still fine in conversation too.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    1. I am not interested in the hotel, but its swimming pool. :mad:
    2. I am interested not in the hotel, but its swimming pool. :mad:
    3. I am interested not in the hotel, but in its swimming pool. :oops:

    In AmE, only sentence 3 looks correct. And that is an awkward sentence in AE -- the "<verb>not...but..." pattern isn't common.

    Whether it is said or implied, the "swimming pool" part needs "I am interested in".

    I am not interested in the hotel: only in its swimming pool.:)
    I am not interested in the hotel. I am only interested in its swimming pool.:)

    Edit: BrE (British English) and AmE (American English) have different normal sentence patterns.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The AE/BE problem may be the intonation
    2. I am not interested in the hotel, [slight pause] but, [slight pause] its swimming pool.
    3. I am interested, [slight pause] not in the hotel, [slight pause] but, [slight pause] in its swimming pool.

    In both cases, but = rather = on the contrary
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    1. I am not interested in the hotel, but its swimming pool. :mad:
    2. I am interested not in the hotel, but its swimming pool. :mad:
    3. I am interested not in the hotel, but in its swimming pool. :oops:

    In AmE, only sentence 3 looks correct. And that is an awkward sentence in AE -- the "<verb>not...but..." pattern isn't common.

    Whether it is said or implied, the "swimming pool" part needs "I am interested in".

    I am not interested in the hotel: only in its swimming pool.:)
    I am not interested in the hotel. I am only interested in its swimming pool.:)

    Edit: BrE (British English) and AmE (American English) have different normal sentence patterns.
    Or inverted I think it works even better.

    I am interested in the pool, not the hotel.
     
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