I am not satisfied with how he did it.

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slovac

Senior Member
Could you tell me please whether in the following sentence the usage of how is correct? Or do native speakers prefer a sentence without how?

I am not satisfied with how he did it
- for example he painted a wall, but the painted wall does not please to me. He chose red colour, but I prefer blue one.
Thank you.
 
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  • slovac

    Senior Member
    Thank you. Could I ask something?
    I think: I am not satisfied with how he did it has not same meaning as the following sentence: I am not satisfied with your doing it, but I am not sure.
    I think:
    I am not satisfied with how he did it - for example he painted a wall, but the painted wall does not please to me. He chose red colour, but I prefer blue one.
    I am not satisfied with your doing(your having done) it - I prefer not painted wall. I did not want him to paint it.
    Could someone confirm whether my explanation is correct?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    If you are not satisfied with how he did it, you are not satisfied with the way/manner in which he did it.

    I am not satisfied with how he did it - for example he painted a wall, but the painted wall does not please to me. He chose red colour, but I prefer blue one. :cross:

    I am not satisfied with what he did it - for example he painted a wall, but the painted wall does not please to me. He chose red colour, but I prefer blue one. :tick:
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I am not satisfied (that) he did it. = I am unsure whether he carried out that action

    A: "I asked my husband to mend the roof but the roof is still leaking.
    I am not satisfied (that) he did it." = I am unsure whether he really did mend the roof.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    There are many different uses of the word "satisfy" in the WRF dictionary
    • (also intr) to fulfil the desires or needs of (a person)
    • to provide amply for (a need or desire)
    • to relieve of doubt; convince
    • to dispel (a doubt)
    • to make reparation to or for
    • to discharge or pay off (a debt) to (a creditor)
    • to fulfil the requirements of; comply with: you must satisfy the terms of your lease
    • to fulfil the conditions of (a theorem, assumption, etc); to yield a truth by substitution of the given value
    The roof example is a different meaning than the wall one.

    If someone does something and you didn't want them to do in the first place (I didn't want him to paint the wall but he did) you would say "I am unhappy..." or "I'm not happy.. etc... that you painted the wall". I would not use "satisfied" in that context - there was no need or desire expressed beforehand.
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Thank you. Could I ask whether the meaning would be changed if I added WITH to the last sentence?
    I am not satisfied with (that) he did it.
    The meaning would go away, because you can't use with followed by that in this context.
    (The roof example of satisfied has the meaning "I am not convinced that he (actually) fixed it).
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    No. A preposition (with) can't take full clause (he did it) as an object.
    I am not satisfied with the way that he did it.
    I am not satisfied with the way in which he did it.
     

    slovac

    Senior Member
    There are many different uses of the word "satisfy" in the WRF dictionary
    The roof example is a different meaning than the wall one.

    If someone does something and you didn't want them to do in the first place (I didn't want him to paint the wall but he did) you would say "I am unhappy..." or "I'm not happy.. etc... that you painted the wall". I would not use "satisfied" in that context - there was no need or desire expressed beforehand.
    If I use your contructiom with usage of happy, can I use also a preposition about?
    I am not happy about that you painted the wall.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    You can ask. I am not unhappy about it.

    I think it's a property of "happy" that allows this.

    I am happy about it.:tick:
    I am happy that you asked.:tick:
    I am happy about that you asked.:cross:
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I am not happy about your painting the wall. = (i) I am not happy because I think that if you paint the wall, it will be a mess. (ii) I am not happy because I think that if you paint the wall, you will hurt yourself. (iii) I don't want you to paint the wall, someone else can do that. (iv) I do not want you to paint the wall neither do I want anyone else to do it.

    Context will explain which one is meant.
     
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