I am planning at renovating my house/ I am planning to leave

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Hello, I would use with confidence the following two expressions because they both sounds right to me in their own context:

I am planning at renovating my house;
I am planning to leave soon.

Are both planning at and planning to good English?

If yes, when it is better to use which one?

Thank you very much.
Giannicola
 
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    Senior Member
    American English
    We don't "plan at" things. We plan things. We plan to do things.

    I am planning to renovate my home.
    I am planning to leave soon.
     
    Thank you for your feedback:)

    YES #Crockett #Slimston it was planning on not planning at what I wanted to refer to. Sorry I am getting old, I've got rust in my brain!


    Is it possible that I can say e.g. "I am planning on starting this new course..." meaning "I am (currently) working at the project of starting this new course..."?

    I.e. "I plan to start" --> I foresee the static moment in which I will start. "I am planning on starting" --> I am considering the time interval during which I will be working at the project of starting.

    Thank you everybody and sorry for messing up.

    The choice of the right preposition is by far what hasten me most when I try to use a viable English. I think I can call it ​phrasal verbs hell...
     
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