I am satisfied with my now job.

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8769

Senior Member
Japanese and Japan
The following is what I have translated from Japanese. I got stuck at the end.

I have never thought of changing jobs. By and large, Isatisfied with my ( ).
Are all, #1 through #3, below, grammatically correct and natural English for the blank?
1. present job
2. job now
3. now job
 
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  • 8769

    Senior Member
    Japanese and Japan
    What do you think is correct, 8769? I can tell you that there is only one correct answer.
    First, I wrote #1. I think #2 is grammatically OK, but in this case "now" modifies "am (satisfied)" and gives a little different nuance. I checked a Japanese-English dictionary, and I found expressions "the now life" and "the now generation," which seem similar to #3.
     
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    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I think you have caught the reason that #2 is not as good a choice as #1. The beginning of the sentence is "I have never thought of changing jobs", while "I am satisfied with my job now" implies that there was a time in the past when the person was not satisfied with the job. The two implications clash.

    "The Now Generation" is a particular catchphrase that uses "Now" in an unusual way.

    As you thought, #1 makes the most sense, at least as I see it.
     
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    I agree, and strongly disagree at the same time.

    In written form I would use no 1.
    In spoken word, I would use no 2, and never no 1.

    The reason being that written down, "present job" is very clear and implicit - whereas "job now" could be ambiguous and relies heavily on stress.

    But in conversation, I would never say "present job". I might, if pushed, say "current job". But 95% of the time I would say "job now." The stress would be very much on the word "now" (so as not to imply a past non-satisfaction, as per JamesM's post).
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    ... present job.
    #1 sounds best to me too.

    Now in now generation is an adjective meaning current, modern, fashionable, trendy. The OED labels this usage colloquial.
    Now has a more-established adjectival use, simply meaning of the present time, that would suggest #3 is also "correct and natural".
    But on reflection, I suspect that this use of now, while correct, is uncommon and may be considered "unnatural" :)
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Could you give us an example, please, Panj.? I've never come across now used adjectivally, as far as I know. To me 3. sounds just wrong.

    I agree with James that the strong implication of the first sentence is that you've always been happy with your present job, so for me 1. is the obvious answer, and 2. suggests that there have been moments when you've been less than happy with your present job.

    I was surprised at Oiseau Pourquoi's post: I see 1. and 2. as having different meanings and both being sentences one could both say and write.
     
    I think that "job now" sounds a lot more informal than "present" when used in conversation - which is why I would write "present job". I think "job now" can have two different meanings - depending on how you say the word ... let me try explain myself:

    Q: "Are you thinking of applying for the job in the paper today?"
    A: "No, by and large I'm satisfied with my job now."
    ... there had been a time once when the job hadn't satisfied me.


    A: "No, by and large I'm satisfied with my job now."
    ... I like the job that I have now, at the present time.

    A: "No, I'm satisfied with my present job, thank you very much."
    ... "present" is just not a word I hear myself say often. But I'd always use it when writing. Also because it doesn't have the two meanings that I can see.

    Hmm, it's so clear to me. That's why I think I'm not explaining myself very well!! :eek:
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Adjectival now is rather like adjectival then.
    Speeches have been quoted as having been given by the then Minister of Endogympathy.
    1998 Daily Tel. 21 Oct. 11/2 Mr Gould presents the now Trade and Industry Secretary as a man torn between his two friends.
     

    Orange Blossom

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    A: "No, by and large I'm satisfied with my job now."
    ... I like the job that I have now, at the present time.
    Regardless of the emphasis on "now", I would not give it the interpretation you have. To me, that simply emphasizes the present satisfaction with the job as opposed to dissatisfaction in the past. If I wished to use 'now' with the interpretation given, I'd change the word order:

    I like the job I now have.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Regardless of the emphasis on "now", I would not give it the interpretation you have. To me, that simply emphasizes the present satisfaction with the job as opposed to dissatisfaction in the past. If I wished to use 'now' with the interpretation given, I'd change the word order:

    I like the job I now have.
    I agree. I can almost hear the unspoken preface.
    ... by and large I'm satisfied with my job now (but it was total rubbish six months ago).
     
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