I am taking maths tuition

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rituparnahoymoy

Senior Member
Assamese -India
I am taking Maths tuition from a senior university teacher.


A senior teacher is giving me maths tuition.

Can taking and giving be used with tuition.

Who is giving you tuition? who are you taking tuition from?
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I assume this means tuition in the British English sense of the word, what we'd call teaching or tutoring in the U.S. The word tuition here has a different meaning: it is the fee one pays for education. (We'd also say math in the singular, not the BE maths, which supports that assumption.)

    If that's true, I'll let BE speakers respond directly to the question.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Egmont is correct: in BE mathematics is abbreviated to maths, which takes a singular verb, and the following are correct - the second is probably more popular:
    1. A senior teacher is giving me maths tuition.
    2. A senior teacher is giving me tuition in maths. (I have not heard the phrase "senior teacher" used.)
    BE does not "take tuition" - it has tuition:

    .....3. I am having maths tuition from a teacher. (probably more popular)
    .....4. I am having tuition in maths from a teacher.

    When asking the teacher if he give tuition, then:

    .....5. Do you give/provide tuition in maths? - this may be followed by "...at/to GCSE1 level to 15-year-olds".


    1 General Certificate in Secondary Education - the national standard for 15/16 year olds. Further study after this will usually be "A" Level - (Advanced Level).
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    We should know something about that here as I believe we are the tuition capital of the world. Teachers resign and give tuition because it's more lucrative!

    But back to the question. A teacher gives tuition. A student/pupil gets tuition from someone. 'Receive tuition' works for me as well as Paul's 'have tuition'.
     

    rituparnahoymoy

    Senior Member
    Assamese -India
    We should know something about that here as I believe we are the tuition capital of the world. Teachers resign and give tuition because it's more lucrative!

    But back to the question. A teacher gives tuition. A student/pupil gets tuition from someone. 'Receive tuition' works for me as well as Paul's 'have tuition'.
    If I ask someone, "Who are you taking maths tuition from"? Is there any problem with that?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    It's not very idiomatic. "Who tutors you?" "Who does the tuition?", "Who's your tutor?", etc.
     
    Last edited:

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Funny, I call what you get from a private tutor, 'tutoring'. Tuition is what you get in school or some educational establishment.
     
    Last edited:

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, that's why I was wondering if Indian use is like Singaporean use - where there is a lot of 'private tuition' going on, taught by a 'tuition teacher' (rather than tutor).
     
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