I am tired but I don't want to sleep.

maghanish2

Senior Member
United States - English
안녕!

My Korean is not very good, but I would like to know if this sentence makes any sense, and if it doesn't please correct it for me.

I am tired but I don't want to sleep.

난 피곤해 그러지만 안 자고싶어.

It doesn't sounds very good to me so I would appreciate your help!

고마워!
 
  • gubei

    Member
    Korean
    안녕!

    My Korean is not very good, but I would like to know if this sentence makes any sense, and if it doesn't please correct it for me.

    I am tired but I don't want to sleep.

    난 피곤해 그러지만 안 자고싶어.

    It doesn't sounds very good to me so I would appreciate your help!

    고마워!
    Hi.

    You'd better speak this way;

    난 피곤해, 그렇지만 자고싶지 않아. or
    나 피곤해, 그렇지만 자고싶지는 않아.

    Don't forget that unlike English, we Koreans tend to express "not" in the end of a sentence.

    Best,

    Gubei
     

    Mack&Mack

    Senior Member
    Korea & Korean
    안녕!

    My Korean is not very good, but I would like to know if this sentence makes any sense, and if it doesn't please correct it for me.

    I am tired but I don't want to sleep.

    난 피곤해 그러지만 안 자고싶어.

    It doesn't sounds very good to me so I would appreciate your help!

    고마워!
    안녕하세요.

    I would say,

    (난) 피곤한데 자고 싶지 않아.

    or

    피곤해, 근데 자고 싶지 않아.

    Mind you that my versions are very colloquial. I wouldn't use them in writing. but is likely to be translated into 하지만, 그렇지만 in writing. However I don't think I would use them in everyday conversation. There might be room for argument though.

    Another thing I'd like to add in spoken English is that it would be better off to leave the subject of a sentence out in Korean in most of the cases.

    Hope this helps. =)
     

    maghanish2

    Senior Member
    United States - English
    Thanks for the help, but I still have a few questions.

    So in colloquial conversations what is the best word for but?

    Also, in your translation, gubei, what does the bold part mean?

    난 피곤해, 그렇지만 자고싶지 않아

    I understand it all but then why is the 지 added at the end of 자고싶?

    Thanks again for the help! I really do appreciate it!
     

    gubei

    Member
    Korean
    Thanks for the help, but I still have a few questions.

    So in colloquial conversations what is the best word for but?

    Also, in your translation, gubei, what does the bold part mean?

    난 피곤해, 그렇지만 자고싶지 않아

    I understand it all but then why is the 지 added at the end of 자고싶?

    Thanks again for the help! I really do appreciate it!
    1. In colloquial conversations.... I think "근데" is a good candidate. However, it depends... For example, "Nobody, nobody but you" cannot be
    translated into "아무도 말고, 아무도 말고 근데 너". This could be understandable to Korean native speakers, but very awkward.

    Simply, a lot of connection words in English and Korean don't have the same scopes of meaning.

    2. You are asking so a big question. Just like we don't have the "relative pronoun" in Korean, you don't have this kind of ending something, which is sometimes for adding some nuance to Koran native speaker and other times for just linking it with negation expressions, in English.
    Sad to speak, it seems that there is no royal road to master this kind of usage in Korean except practice.

    FYI, according to my best knowledge, my mother tongue resembles the ancient Sumerian. I've heard this from a professor in linguistics in Korea, who is good at even Latin, Greek, and other scores of ancient languages.

    Hope this helps.

    Best,

    Gubei
     

    Mack&Mack

    Senior Member
    Korea & Korean
    Thanks for the help, but I still have a few questions.

    So in colloquial conversations what is the best word for but?

    Also, in your translation, gubei, what does the bold part mean?

    난 피곤해, 그렇지만 자고싶지 않아

    I understand it all but then why is the 지 added at the end of 자고싶?

    Thanks again for the help! I really do appreciate it!
    I agree with gubei, the Korean for but can vary depending on the context. The following situations are a couple of examples I can think of offhand where 근데 is quite idiomatic. Just in case you haven't noticed, 근데 is a shorten form of 그런데 which is one of many expressions meaning but.

    I went to the shop, but it was closed.
    가게에 갔었어, 근데(그런데) 문 닫았더라.

    I aced the test, but that didn't make me feel good.
    시험은 잘 봤어, 근데(그런데) 기분이 좋지 않았어.

    As for your question about 난 피곤해, 그렇지만 자고싶지 않아,

    ~하고 싶다 would be I want to do something.

    자고 싶다 would be I want to sleep.

    ~하고 싶지 않다 is a negative from of ~하고 싶다, which would be translated into I don't want to do something.

    For instance,

    자고 싶지 않아. I don't want to sleep. Or possibly I don't want to go to bed.

    먹고 싶지 않아. I don't want to eat. I don't feel like eating. and the like.

    Hope this helps.:)
     

    maghanish2

    Senior Member
    United States - English
    Thank you so much for the help! Your explanations are very clear and understandable and it makes a lot of sense to me know.

    Thanks!
     
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