I am writing to apply for William Frank<Frank's> Bursary ...

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  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    It most likely should be "..to apply for the William Frank Bursary..." The name of the scholarship (I'm assuming it's a scholarship) is probably the Willian Frank Bursary.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I am fairly sure that it does not belong to William Frank, but was named for William Frank. The people who donated the money for it chose its name. You should use precisely the name they gave it, with no modification of any kind and with great care about the exact spelling of all names.

    In particular, I believe it is Wilhelm, not William, Frank. If the organization that controls the Bursary has more qualified applicants than it can give money to, that sort of error can cause them to discard your application immediately in order to simplify their work. If they are asked for a reason, they would say that such an error suggests a lack of attention to detail that would make a person a poor biologist.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    When things are named after people the possessive is not used. 'Named after' means 'named in memory of'.

    The person's name is treated like an adjective.

    By the way you also need to check carefully whether or not the full name of any bursary or scholarship or prize is "The William Frank Bursary" with a capitalized definite article. Sometimes there is a definite article before the name, sometimes there isn't.

    Hermione
     
    When things are named after people the possessive is not used. 'Named after' means 'named in memory of'.

    The person's name is treated like an adjective.

    By the way you also need to check carefully whether or not the full name of any bursary or scholarship or prize is "The William Frank Bursary" with a capitalized definite article. Sometimes there is a definite article before the name, sometimes there isn't.
    Hermione
    Thank you so much, you have right there is a definite article but not a cpitale in that sentence"I am writing to apply for the William Frank<Frank's..."
    And basing on your speech why here the possessive 's is used " Have you read John's letter? This is John Gray's house, and Socrates' ideas.. and so on.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ...And basing on your speech why here the possessive 's is used " Have you read John's letter? This is John Gray's house, and Socrates' ideas.. and so on.
    You may have missed my post #3. The letter belongs, or belonged when it was first written, to John. The house belongs to John Gray. The ideas belong, or belonged when he was alive, to Socrates. The bursary does not belong to William (see the second paragraph of that post regarding "William"), but was named for him. That is the reason for the difference.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    In my city, we have Abraham Lincoln's home. He lived there, he owned it (the only home he ever owned, if I'm not mistaken).

    We also have the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. He didn't own that facility; he was dead over a hundred years before it was built. But it was named after him.
     
    Last edited:
    You may have missed my post #3. The letter belongs, or belonged when it was first written, to John. The house belongs to John Gray. The ideas belong, or belonged when he was alive, to Socrates. The bursary does not belong to William (see the second paragraph of that post regarding "William"), but was named for him. That is the reason for the difference.
    Then can I conclude that all "The William Frank Bursary" is a name of scholarship, if the scholarship/or any thing else is named by any person then I can't add it after the proper name as possessive (apostrophe and "s" after the proper name ). Finally, should the definite article be a capitalized definite article if there is?
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    1. It is the name of a scholarship, but please check the first name VERY carefully. As I posted earlier, it is NOT "William." It is a different language's form of that name. You continue to repeat this error by writing "William" in every post. It is ESSENTIAL to be EXACTLY correct in this. I cannot stress enough how easily this error can destroy your chance of winning this scholarship, even if you are the top student in your department and would otherwise receive it.

    2. That is correct. Aside from the possessive being incorrect, since the bursary does not belong to W. Frank, you cannot modify its name in ANY way.

    3. The word "the" should be capitalized or not according to its usage in official materials about this bursary. Be guided by their Web pages and printed materials in this regard.
     
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