I beg your indulgence / Grant me this indulgence

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moonglow

Banned
English – America
I cannot find an answer to this anywhere. What does "Indulge me" or "Grant me this indulgence" or "I beg your indulgence" mean?

A person getting ready to deliver a speech said to the crowd, "Could you please indulge me for 20 minutes," or, similarly, "Ladies and gentlemen, I beg your indulgence."

Thank you.
 
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  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    The speaker means something like "Please tolerate me for the next twenty minutes." If the "ladies and gentlemen" are indulging the speaker, they are putting up with him even if they don't want to.
     

    moonglow

    Banned
    English – America
    Thank you!

    Thanks, owlman!

    So it basically means "hear me out and listen to what I have to say. If you're not interested, pretend as if you are and indulge (humor) me." Not that you'd ever say this.
     
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    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Moonglow, there's a dictionary here in the forum; just enter a word or phrase in the box at the top of the page. For indulgence, we find:

    indulgence /ɪnˈdʌldʒəns/ n
    • the act of indulging or state of being indulgent
    • a pleasure, habit, etc, indulged in; extravagance
    • liberal or tolerant treatment
    • something granted as a favour or privilege
    • a remission of the temporal punishment for sin after its guilt has been forgiven

    Clearly, it's #3; tolerance. If you don't know the meaning of a word, it's a good idea to use the dictionary. (There are also other online dictionaries; you can find them by Googling the word or phrase.) If you're still puzzled, of course you can ask here.
     

    enlighten

    New Member
    english
    Parla, it's clear that the forums are used to get clarity on a word. Most dictionaries cannot define a cliche which is why I appreciate this post and Owlmans response. I am sure Moonglow looked up the definition as did I and was not able to deduce the meaning of the cliche. Your post is rude and doesn't help anyone. It's a year later but I found the preceding posts to yours helpful.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Welcome to the forum, Enlighten.

    Words and phrases aren't excluded from dictionaries on the basis of being clichés.

    I'm glad that you found some of the posts in the thread helpful.
     
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