I bet 1000 NT dollars with/to you that

arueng

Senior Member
CHINESE
I bet 1000 NT dollars with/to you that the Netherlands will lift up the World cup trophy.
I bet you 1000 NT dollars that ...


Hi,

Should I use with or to in the first instance in the above?
Does the second in the above also work?

Thanks.
 
  • arueng

    Senior Member
    CHINESE
    to and with are not needed and I am quite sure that they are incorrect.

    Yes, the second one is correct.
    Thanks, Invictus.

    To make sure, do you mean the following is also right?

    I bet 1000 NT dollars (with) you that the Netherlands will lift up ...
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hi Arueng. I can't speak for Invictus, of course. I can tell you how I'd make a bet:

    I bet a thousand dollars that the Netherlands will lift up...
    Or,: I bet you a thousand dollars that the Netherlands will lift up...
     

    arueng

    Senior Member
    CHINESE
    This just popped into my mind, and I find it difficutl not to get it out off my chest:

    Is it ok to say in a tongue-in-cheek manner, "I bet you my castle in the air that the Netherlands ...?"
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    If you said that to me, you'd sure get a laugh. When you tell me that you're willing to bet your castle in the air, you're telling me that you're really not betting anything at all.
     

    arueng

    Senior Member
    CHINESE
    If you said that to me, you'd sure get a laugh. When you tell me that you're willing to bet your castle in the air, you're telling me that you're really not betting anything at all.
    Thanks, owlman.

    I did mean to be humourous!
    But I meant when I lose, I lose nothing but a castle in the air.
    But when I win, I'd win some thing or money from the person I bet.
    Did I get aross this meaning in "I bet you my castle in the air ...?" If not, how should I rephrase it in order to convey this tongue-in-cheek humor?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Make sure your listener understands that he has to bet something real like money while you are only betting that airy castle of yours.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I bet 1000 NT dollars with/to you that the Netherlands will lift up the World cup trophy.
    I bet you 1000 NT dollars that ...
    ...
    The second sounds good, but omit "up". They will "lift" the world cup if you mean win.
    I bet you 1,000 NT dollars that The Netherlands will lift (win) the World Cup.
     

    arueng

    Senior Member
    CHINESE
    The second sounds good, but omit "up". They will "lift" the world cup if you mean win.
    I bet you 1,000 NT dollars that The Netherlands will lift (win) the World Cup.
    Thanks, Pan.
    Yes, when I started to post this thread, I was hesitating if I should keep "up" or leave it out. But it makes no difference to me since I don't have the instinct.
    Since you mentioned it, I'd like to know the reason why it should be left out. Thanks in advance.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    If you say "lift up" you are definitely talking about the physical action of raising the cup in the air.

    If you say "lift" you are using the sporting sense, meaning "win".
     

    arueng

    Senior Member
    CHINESE
    If you say "lift up" you are definitely talking about the physical action of raising the cup in the air.
    Thanks, pan, for the explanation.
    But there is still a bit of confusion in my mind.

    Isn't the physical action of raising the cup in the air symbolic of victory and thus winning?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top