I bet...And you'd lose that bet

Phoebe1200

Senior Member
Russian-Russia
Henry Danger, TV series

Jasper: I'm taking a belt making class. (pulls a belt out of his backpack) All I have left to do is punch the holes and add the buckle.
Henry: Wow! You know, I bet Charlotte would love a new handmade belt.
Charlotte: And you'd lose that bet.


Why did Charlotte use the form with "would"?
 
  • VicNicSor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Because Henry is not actually making a bet. "I bet that ..." means "I'm sure that ...". Charlotte says that if Henry were really betting, he would lose the money.
     

    Phoebe1200

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    Because Henry is not actually making a bet. "I bet that ..." means "I'm sure that ...". Charlotte says that if Henry were really betting, he would lose the money.
    So there's an implied if-clause, like this?

    Charlotte: And you'd lose that bet if you were actually to bet on it.
     

    VicNicSor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Yes, if it were something like this:):

    Henry: Wow! You know, I bet you $20 Charlotte will love a new handmade belt.
    Charlotte: And you'll lose that bet.
     

    Phoebe1200

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    Henry: Wow! You know, I bet you $20 Charlotte will love a new handmade belt.
    Charlotte: And you'll lose that bet.
    Thanks. But I don't understand why you added "$20" to it. I mean what difference does it bring? Can't it be said without it?

    Henry: Wow! You know, I bet Charlotte will love a new handmade belt.
    Charlotte: And you'll lose that bet.
     
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    VicNicSor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I added "$20" to change the meaning of "bet". In the OP, it means this:

    "used to say that you are fairly sure that something is true, something is happening etc, although you cannot prove this"

    In #9, it means this:

    "to risk money on the result of a race, game, competition, or other future event"

    So, now (in #9) the two "bet" in Charlotte's and Henry's lines have the same meaning (except that the latter is a noun, of course)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I added "$20" to change the meaning of "bet". In the OP, it means this:

    "used to say that you are fairly sure that something is true, something is happening etc, although you cannot prove this"

    In #9, it means this:

    "to risk money on the result of a race, game, competition, or other future event"

    So, now (in #9) the two "bet" in Charlotte's and Henry's lines have the same meaning (except that the latter is a noun, of course)
    You wouldn't be willing to risk money if you weren't fairly sure that it was true. We often add an amount of money to show how sure we are, not because we actually want to risk actual money.
    I bet you $1, ... I'm not very sure.
    I bet you $20, ... I'm pretty sure.
    I bet you a million, billion dollars, ... I'm emphatically 100% sure.
    The amount of money doesn't actually change the meaning.
     

    VicNicSor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    You wouldn't be willing to risk money if you weren't fairly sure that it was true. We often add an amount of money to show how sure we are, not because we actually want to risk actual money.
    I bet you $1, ... I'm not very sure.
    I bet you $20, ... I'm pretty sure.
    I bet you a million, billion dollars, ... I'm emphatically 100% sure.
    The amount of money doesn't actually change the meaning.
    To be more precise, I added "you $20". I.e., I changed the grammar: "Someone bets that (+ clause)" --> "someone bets someone $XX that (+ clause)":)
     

    VicNicSor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    You wouldn't be willing to risk money if you weren't fairly sure that it was true. We often add an amount of money to show how sure we are, not because we actually want to risk actual money.
    I bet you $1, ... I'm not very sure.
    I bet you $20, ... I'm pretty sure.
    I bet you a million, billion dollars, ... I'm emphatically 100% sure.
    The amount of money doesn't actually change the meaning.
    If we add "you $1/20/1 000 000/etc" to the OP, then we would have to change "you'd lose" to "you'll lose", do you agree?...
     

    Phoebe1200

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    Thank you.:)

    If we add "you $1/20/1 000 000/etc" to the OP, then we would have to change "you'd lose" to "you'll lose", do you agree?...
    I think I understand what you're saying.:) That is, if we add a certain amount of money to the sentence of the OP in Henry's line then that would change the meaning since it would mean that Henry is actually willing to bet on Charlotte's wanting to have a handmade belt and therefore Charlotte's sentence has to change to "you'll lose that bet" to mean that Henry's going to lose the bet if he actually does bet on it.

    Did I get it right?:)

    P.S. Henry was just messing with Charlotte.:)
     
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    Phoebe1200

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    iCarly, TV series

    Teacher: It's national green week. <-----Excess quote removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->Who wants to sing the jingle? I bet Carly wants to sing it.
    Carly: Oh, you'd lose that bet.

    How do you understand this one?
     
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    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Firstly, there is absolutely no requirement in English that a reply needs to be grammatically consistent with a preceding statement or question. Secondly, "I bet", "I'll bet", "I'd bet", "betcha" and many other variants can be used here to mean the same thing. The same reply is therefore possible for all variants.
     
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    Phoebe1200

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    Firstly, there is absolutely no requirement in English that a reply needs to be grammatically consistent with a preceding statement or question. Secondly, "I bet", "I'll bet", "I'd bet", "betcha" and many other variants can be used here to mean the same thing. The same reply is therefore possible for all variants.
    I really appreciate your answer.:)

    Also, do I correctly understand that if a person starts his sentence with either of these "I bet", "I'll bet", "I'd bet", and whatever he says is directed at me and if I want to contradict his statement I can almost always use "you'd lose that bet" which would mean that if he were to actually bet he would lose that bet even though, of course, the person starting a sentence with "I bet" never really intends to actually bet?
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    If you are in doubt, please indicate the other possible interpretation you have seen in post 19 so I can avoid confusing you in future.
     

    Scott AM

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    I really appreciate your answer.:)

    Also, do I correctly understand that if a person starts his sentence with either of these "I bet", "I'll bet", "I'd bet", and whatever he says is directed at me and if I want to contradict his statement I can almost always use "you'd lose that bet" which would mean that if he were to actually bet he would lose that bet even though, of course, the person starting a sentence with "I bet" never really intends to actually bet?
    You can certainly say that. But keep in mind, "I bet..." (and all variations) are idiomatic phrases. They are set phrases that mean "I am very sure". The reply "and you'd lose that bet" is not a set phrase. It is a funny, non-standard, contrary reply to "I'll bet". Most everyone would understand what you mean - that you disagree - even if they haven't heard that particular reply before. But if you use this same reply ("and you'll lose that bet!") every time someone said "I bet...", then people would start to wonder why you keep using the same joke statement over and over.
     

    Phoebe1200

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    If you are in doubt, please indicate the other possible interpretation you have seen in post 19 so I can avoid confusing you in future.
    I was asking about the usage of the phrase "you'd lose that bet" in such situations in 20.:)
    But if you use this same reply ("and you'll lose that bet!")
    Thank you, Scott, very much.:) But why did you change "you'd" to "you'll" here?
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    I understand your question 20, I was asking what made you think it wasn't answered by 19. When you ask confirmation of something that has already been stated we are confused and wonder what you haven't understood.

    I believe that Scott simply made a mistake, but his phrase is also possible in the circumstances you describe.
     

    Scott AM

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    I understand your question 20, I was asking what made you think it wasn't answered by 19. When you ask confirmation of something that has already been stated we are confused and wonder what you haven't understood.

    I believe that Scott simply made a mistake, but his phrase is also possible in the circumstances you describe.
    Thanks - I was going to say exactly that.
     
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