I bought a flight ticket at the price of 5 euros to Venice.

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Jawel7

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello everyone.

In my sentence (I bought a flight ticket at the price of 5 euros to Venice), there are two prepositional phrases(at the price of 5 euros AND to Venice) referring to the same noun "a flight ticket".
However, I am not sure about their order.

1-) I bought [a flight ticket [at the price of 5 euros] [to Venice]].

2-) I bought [a flight ticket [to Venice] [at the price of 5 euros]].

Which one is correct grammatically?
According to my opinion, both of them are grammatically correct.
What do you think?
Thank you very much in advance.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Both are correct, but these are more natural:

    I bought an air ticket for 5 euros to Venice. (Ok, but not great.)
    I bought an air ticket to Venice for 5 euros. (Very natural.)

    I'm not sure about the format of "5 euros," so I leave that to someone else.
     

    Jawel7

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Both are correct, but these are more natural:

    I bought an air ticket for 5 euros to Venice. (Ok, but not great.)
    I bought an air ticket to Venice for 5 euros. (Very natural.)

    I'm not sure about the format of "5 euros," so I leave that to someone else.
    The prepositional phrase "for 5 euros" in your sentences is working as an adverbial.
    So I don't think that your first sentence is OK. (Understandable but grammatically not good)
    Your second sentence is completely OK.
    Additionally, I'd say: "I bought an air ticket of 5 euros to Venice" by using "of 5 euros" instead of "for 5 euros", but it's also OK.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Not to go too far off topic, but I was under the impression that the lowercased "euros" was used. :)
     
    Last edited:

    Jawel7

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Why did you place a question mark at the end of that sentence? It is not a question.
    "I bought a 5-Euros flight ticket to Venice" :cross:
    "I bought a 5-Euro flight ticket to Venice" :tick:
    Yes, It is. I implied it as a question.
    Thanks for the answers.
    Do you also think that "I bought a flight ticket of 5 Euros to Venice" is bad English? If you do, could you please explain why?
     

    Jawel7

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    "I bought an air ticket of 5 euros to Venice" by using "of 5 euros" instead of "for 5 euros", but it's also OK.
    It isn't "OK". It's bad English.
    Which part is incorrect grammatically?
    [an air ticket of 5 Euros] is a phrase.
    "I bought [an air ticket of 5 Euros] to Venice".
    Can you say what the problem is?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    No to go too far off topic, but I was under the impression that the lowercased "euros" was used.
    From the notes section at Language and the euro - Wikipedia
    English Style Guide: A handbook for authors and translators in the European Commission (PDF) (Fifth edition (revised) ed.). European Commission Directorate-General for Translation. May 2008. Retrieved 12 January 2009. 20.8 The euro. Like ‘pound’, ‘dollar’ [etc.] the word ‘euro’ is written in lower case with no initial capital and, where appropriate, takes the plural ‘s’ (as does ‘cent’):This book costs ten euros and fifty cents. However, in documents and tables where monetary amounts figure largely, make maximum use of the € symbol (closed up to the figure) or the abbreviation EUR before the amount.
    European Central Bank (13 December 2005). "Opinion of the European Central Bank of 1 December 2005 on a proposal for a Council Regulation amending Regulation (EC) No 974/98 on the introduction of the euro (CON/2005/51)" (PDF). Official Journal of the European Union. Retrieved 7 September 2008. For reasons of legal certainty, the ECB recommends that the text of the proposed regulation incorporates in its normative part a provision confirming that ‘the spelling of the name of the euro shall be identical in the nominative singular case in all the official languages of the European Union, taking into account the existence of different alphabets.
    (Apparently, German has an exemption as all nouns are capitalised...)
    That does it! Nobody legislates on the English language! I'm keeping the upper-case! :D
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    We don't use 'of' like this. We buy something for a price. Cagey corrected you on this point in #2, but it seems you are too busy contradicting people to notice such details.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I see some phrases such as "a sleep of 7 hours"
    You have totally misunderstood the function of "of" in this sentence:

    of = that consists of; that is made from/out of; whose component/constituent parts are
    "a sleep of 7 hours" = "a sleep that consists of 7 hours"
    "It is made of gold" = "it is made out of/from gold."
    "The vase is made of sea-shells" = "The component parts of the vase are sea-shells."

    "The ticket is not made of/from euros."
     
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