I called <the> archaeologist <most knowledgeable> about the ancient Egypt

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park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The following is my own my making.
1. I called the archaeologist most knowledgeable about the ancient Egypt in the state to ask.... .
[Source: Reading for Results Ninth Edition by Laraine Flemming]
I'd like to know when the superlative modifies it behind a noun, if "the" is positioned before the noun"
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Your question isn't clear, but "the archaeologist most knowledgeable" means the same as "the archaeologist who is [the] most knowledgeable" (the second definite article is optional).

    There is one mistake: we would say "ancient Egypt," not "the ancient Egypt."
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, The Newt, for your kind answer.:)
    Florentia52 said:
    Did you write this sentence fragment yourself, park sang joon, or is it from the source you cite?
    I wrote it for myself.
    The Newt said:
    There is one mistake: we would say "ancient Egypt," not "the ancient Egypt."
    I thought I tell one of every Egypt in time period.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Florentia 52, for your additional information.:)
    Then, I was wondering why we use "the spoken English," not "spoken English."
     
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    JustKate

    Senior Member
    Thank you, Florentia 52, for your additional information.:)
    Then, I was wondering why we use "the spoken English," not "spoken English."
    We would ordinarily say "spoken English" not "the spoken English." Perhaps there are exceptions - and perhaps there are with "ancient Egypt" too - but under nearly all normal circumstances, we would not precede either of these with an article so long as they're functioning as nouns. Thanks to Google, I see that there is some sort of program called The Spoken English Program, but that's not what I'd consider a "normal circumstance."
     
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    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I see that there is some sort of program called The Spoken English Program, but that's not what I'd consider a "normal circumstance."
    That's not the spoken English - it's the program, with Spoken English inserted adjectivally as the title.
     
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