I can be your muse but don't expect anything more. What does it mean?

goldencypress

Senior Member
India - Malayalam
When a woman tells a man:

"At best, I can be your MUSE, but don't expect anything more."

What does she really mean?

Thank you.
 
  • Moonchild.F

    Member
    persian
    When a woman tells a man:

    "At best, I can be your MUSE, but don't expect anything more."

    What does she really mean?

    Thank you.
    As i found in Longman Dictionary, being someone's MUSE means:
    the force or person that makes them want to write, paint, or make music, and helps them to have good ideas. =inspiration
    Hope it'll be helpful.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    That's the definition of 'muse'. I thought the OP was asking about the second part of the sentence: the answer to that is that we don't know what she means because there's no context.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    As a rule, only creative people like poets or artists have a muse — someone who inspires them to produce better work. Historically, it’s common for famous male painters, especially, to have had a female muse who was also their mistress.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It is almost a cliche that an artist will create a series of paintings of an attractive woman (very often portrayed nude) and will descirbe her as having been his muse, i.e. his source of inspiration. There is often the assumption that they also had 'something more', i.e. sexual relations.

    (cross-posted with lingobingo)
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    As a rule, only creative people like poets or artists have a muse — someone who inspires them to produce better work. Historically, it’s common for famous male painters, especially, to have had a female muse who was also their mistress.
    Thank you. I really hope the woman who wrote to me means what you have said - that she would be my mistress.

    But the second part of message doesn't give room for that hope.,
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    But those are very prosaic definitions of muse. It’s actually more to do with the Muses in Greek mythology.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    If you come across an unfamiliar word, the WR dictionary is a good resource, especially when you have the context and you know which part of speech the word is.

    muse (WR dictionary), n. the imaginary force thought to provide inspiration to poets, writers, artists, etc.: waiting for the muse.

    Earlier threads:
    chase off his fickle muse
    We are each the muse to the other
    I did look up the dictionary before posting my query. But I wanted the clarification from knowledgeable people.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    They were goddesses of the arts and sciences:

    Calliope (epic poetry), Clio (history), Euterpe (flute playing and lyric poetry), Terpsichore (choral dancing and song), Erato (lyre playing and lyric poetry), Melpomene (tragedy), Thalia (comedy and light verse), Polyhymnia (hymns, and later mime), Urania (astronomy).
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    What actually did the Muses in Greek mythology do?
    That's in the WR dictionary too.

    Muse -
    • any of a number of sister goddesses, originally given as Aoede (song), Melete (meditation), and Mneme (memory), but latterly and more commonly as the nine daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne who presided over various arts: Calliope (epic poetry), Clio (history), Erato (lyric poetry), Euterpe (music), Melpomene (tragedy), Polyhymnia (religious music), Terpsichore (dance), Thalia (comedy), and Urania (astronomy); identified by the Romans with the Camenae.
    • any goddess presiding over a particular art.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    They were goddesses of the arts and sciences:

    Calliope (epic poetry), Clio (history), Euterpe (flute playing and lyric poetry), Terpsichore (choral dancing and song), Erato (lyre playing and lyric poetry), Melpomene (tragedy), Thalia (comedy and light verse), Polyhymnia (hymns, and later mime), Urania (astronomy).
    But that isn't applicable to my context, is it?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Of course it is. It's the name from which the word "muse" in your context was derived. Don't you see the connection? They're the patron goddesses of certain arts and a muse acts as inspiration to an artist.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    Of course it is. It's the name from which the word "muse" in your context was derived. Don't you see the connection? They're the patron goddesses of certain arts and a muse acts as inspiration to an artist.
    But I am no artist and she knows that.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    All we can do is tell you what muse probably means. We don't know the context. If you're curious about why she used the word, she's the only person who can explain.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    All we can do is tell you what muse probably means. We don't know the context. If you're curious about why she used the word, she's the only person who can explain.
    I agree, but I cannot bring myself to ask her. That is my predicament mm
     
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