I can see everyone wear a mask like they bring their wallets

kachibi

Senior Member
Chinese
Say, I want to wriite a poem about Covid-19.

I want to say the way that people wear masks is similar to the way that people bring thier wallets.

I can see everyone wear a mask like they bring their wallets.

I wonder if there are any grammatical mistakes in the above sentence.
 
  • Lamb67

    Senior Member
    China/Mandarin
    Wearing a mask has almost become a habit as carrying a wallet now. 🤩
     
    Last edited:

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English (US - northeast)
    I want to say the way that people wear masks is similar to the way that people bring thier wallets.
    You can express this, but you need to change a couple words in order to be idiomatic:
    I can see everyone wear a mask like they bring their wallets.
    I see everyone wearing a mask, like they carry a wallet.
    Most of the suggested changes are style. But one is grammar: "I can see" means "I am able to see".
    But "I see" means "this is what I see happening in public places".

    Of course, @Lamb67's sentence in post #2 expresses the meaning. But this is poetry. In poetry, the way you express something might be important. Perhaps your poem wants to show that you are out in public places, in addition to the "what people do" idea.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    Depending on context, especially diferences in US & UK usage, you might check for wallet, purse, and handbag, etc.

    In UK, "wallet" is usually signified for men and excluding women - I emphasise typically.

    I'm just saying that word might seem strange in around the English-speaking world.

    Further, some uses might seem the same, but in reality is different.

    I hope this helps! And maybe other contributer make clearer and shorter!
     
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