I can't wait

ForzaMilan

Senior Member
English
In English, we say "I can't wait", meaning I'm excited or I really want to do something. What is the equivelant expression in Italian. Is it "Non posso aspettare" or is it something else?

grazie
 
  • TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    Which apparently is also used for the English "I'm looking forward to..." even though the underlying anticipation can be much more tepid in this instance. ;)

    Elisabetta
     

    GavinW

    Senior Member
    British English
    Paulfromitaly said:
    Non vedo l'ora di.
    Yes, but our milanista ought to be aware that the phrase "I can't wait" (tout court) is simply "Non vedo l'ora" (without the di, which is only needed if you then specify what it is you are eagerly looking forward to doing)
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    GavinW said:
    Yes, but our milanista ought to be aware that the phrase "I can't wait" (tout court) is simply "Non vedo l'ora" (without the di, which is only needed if you then specify what it is you are eagerly looking forward to doing)
    You're right..Thanks for the specification.
     

    english bird

    Member
    english
    :) Me again!

    I am very new at Italian and I find it very tricky to write a sentence that makes sence hehe could someone help me translate this into Italian please,

    ''I can't wait to see you again! I hope when I arrive we will go out and party all night long! Just like we used to do (just like before) !!!!! I miss that the most! I have so much fun with you! Have a good weekend and I will see you on thursday night ! ''

    Thanks guys!
    ciao!
     

    claudine2006

    Senior Member
    Italy Italian
    Non vedo l'ora di rivederti. Spero che quando sarò lì usciremo a divertirci tutta la notte! Proprio come facevamo prima!!! È ciò che più mi manca. Mi sono divertito/a molto con te! Ti auguro un buon weekend. Ci vediamo giovedì sera.
     

    Cam77

    Member
    England - English
    Ciao tutti

    I want to write 'I can't wait' but need help (my brain has died)....

    Would it be:
    non aspetto, or
    non posso aspetto

    The context is 'I can't wait to see you'

    Sorry if this is really basic, i'm a new learner!

    Thanks

    Cam
     

    narmoriel

    Senior Member
    italia
    Hi,
    it can be:
    "Non posso aspettare per vederti"
    But I think it is better :
    "Non vedo l'ora di vederti"
    or
    "Non resisto . Devo vederti"
    Narmoriel
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Non posso aspettare per vederti = I have been waiting for 10 mins and I have to go to the library now.

    Non vedo l'ora di vederti = I am really excited about seeing you

    Do you see the different contexts?
     

    Cam77

    Member
    England - English
    Ok, thanks.

    I think the trick with Italian is to get used to sentences without trying to translate/analyse each word.

    Grazie
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Exactly!

    Like "to come to mind" - we use in English, but in Italian it's "Venire in mente" and sometimes there are only little differences of a preposition, other times, total different verbs and phrase structures are used.

    It will be annoying, it still is for me, but I've accepted Italian is like that and the less time I spend being annoying at it and focus that time on memorising the differences, the better.
     

    Janey UK

    Senior Member
    Native speaker of British English
    Salve a tutti

    Re the idiom, NON VEDER L’ORA DI, is this exactly the same regardless of who is saying it?

    Ie. if I want to say I’m looking forward to visiting Italy would I say: non veder l’ora di visiterò in Italia?

    And if I wanted to say We are looking forward to going to the Colosseum, would I say: non veder l’ora di andremo alle Collosseo?

    And if I wanted to say: he is looking forward to going to school, would I say: non veder l’ora di andrà a scuola?

    Do you use the future tense of the connected verb? And is the non veder l’ora bit always the same?

    Sorry for asking such a basic question! I get confused so quickly! :confused:

    Grazie mille,

    Jane
     

    Mickele

    Senior Member
    Italian, Tuscany
    Ciao. "Non vedere l'ora di" is always followed by the infinitive.
    That is... Non vedo l'ora di ... visitare l'Italia ...andare al Colosseo, ...andare a scuola. :)

    Hope this helps.
     

    daniele712

    Senior Member
    Italia
    Ciao. "Non vedere l'ora di" is always followed by the infinitive.
    That is... Non vedo l'ora di ... visitare l'Italia ...andare al Colosseo, ...andare a scuola. :)

    Hope this helps.:tick:
    Also non vedo l'ora che(accada qualcosa)-modo congiuntivo
    non vedo l'ora di(fare qualcosa)-modo infinito
    non vedo l'ora che sorga il sole
    non vedo l'ora di guardare il sole sorgere
    non vedo l'ora di andare a scuola
    non vedo l'ora che inizi la scuola

    :)
     

    guixols

    Senior Member
    USA / English, German
    Ciao Gina,

    I would say "Non vedo l'ora che tu arrivi a NY" or maybe "Non vedo l'ora che tu venga a NY", but the first seems better.

    Cheers,

    G
     

    guixols

    Senior Member
    USA / English, German
    Grazie, Simona. Non ne ero sicuro, e sono così abituato all' -i per la forma di tu che "tu venga" mi suona quasi sbagliato, benché io sappia che è corretto.
    G
     

    slucia

    Member
    English Canada
    :) Hello,
    I was wondering if someone could help me translate this into italian.

    I truly can't wait to see you again. I hope I will be able to come to Italy again this year.

    Thanks so much...
     

    b2b

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    :) Hello,
    I was wondering if someone could help me translate this into italian.

    I truly can't wait to see you again. I hope I will be able to come to Italy again this year.

    Thanks so much...
    Welcome slucia!

    Non vedo l'ora di riverderti (di nuovo/un altra volta). Spero di riuscire a tornare in Italia un'altra volta quest'anno.

    The di nuovo part is useless (vedere = to see; rivedere = to see again) but I added it in order to "stress" the meaning (and to translate somehow truly).

    Ciao
     

    I can try!

    New Member
    Salve a tutti

    Re the idiom, NON VEDER L’ORA DI, is this exactly the same regardless of who is saying it?

    Ie. if I want to say I’m looking forward to visiting Italy would I say: non veder l’ora di (visiterò) visitare l' Italia?

    And if I wanted to say We are looking forward to going to the Colosseum, would I say: non veder l’ora di andare al Collosseo?

    And if I wanted to say: he is looking forward to going to school, would I say: non veder l’ora di andare a scuola?

    Do you use the future tense of the connected verb? And is the non veder l’ora bit always the same?

    Sorry for asking such a basic question! I get confused so quickly! :confused:

    Grazie mille,

    Jane
     

    andrea78

    Member
    italian
    Salve a tutti!
    come posso costruire in inglese una frase con il seguente senso: "non vedere l'ora di..."
    Per esempio: " Non vedo l'ora di arrivare/di rivedervi/ritornare"
    Grazie mille
     

    giovannino

    Senior Member
    Italian, Neapolitan
    "Look forward to..." is perfectly correct. I think it's just more formal. It's often found at the end of business letters ("I look forward to hearing from you").

    I think "can't wait to..." is also stronger. Do native speakers agree?
     

    vikgigio

    Senior Member
    Italian, Italy
    I also heard the phrase "I'm dying to..". Is it used?
    EX: Non vedo l'ora di andare a Parigi -> I'm dying to go to Paris.
    (I know that 'I can't wait to go to Paris' would be the best, but I'm just asking whether it would sound well if it were substituted by "I'm dying to..")
     

    Danieloid

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    alxmrphy said:
    Cara mia, non vedo l'ora di vederti domani:tick:
    Mmmmm… Sorry Alex, but that sounds strange to me.
    I'd say:
    Non vedo l'ora che sia domani per vederti.
    Domani ci vedremo: non vedo l'ora!
    The problem is that I non vedo l'ora di vederti now. If you say non vedo l'ora di vederti domani it sounds strange. Probably it's gramatically correct, but I'd not say it that way.
    Ciao!

    Welcome ViniVidiVici! (Actually it's Veni vidi vici! :))
     
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