I could do with...

Dianann

Member
Korean
Hi !
I was learning about “I could do with something” sentences
Then this thoughs keep bothering me about which occasions it would fit more appropriately.

Let’s say, I really need help some translating for writing proper business email. I ask my collegue to give me a hand.

In this situation

1) I could do with a little help from you
2) I would appreciate your help in translating~~

Which one in the above would you use in this case?

And
Does 1)sound more colloquial than 2)?
And 2) is often used in literary?

Or just simply, can you give me a hand? will do?

The reason of this thread is ..
When I first came across this “I could do with” I get it what it means, but I was keep doubting about whether I really understand how I gonna use it.

Should I use it in more casual conversation? Or I can also use in formal situation.

Any help would be really appreciated!
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    'Could do with' is casual and colloquial. The other is formal in speech and might be more suitable talking to a superior.

    (The form 'gonna' is extremely casual and should not be used in writing except in chat rooms and suchlike)
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Further to grassy's point,
    1) I could do with a little help from you -> this is informal and is also used with an annoyed tone of voice when you think that the person should be helping you, but they are not helping you.

    A: John! You can see that I am having difficulty translating this, and I know that you speak the language - I could do with some help from you.

    2) I would appreciate your help in translating~~ -> this is a polite request.
     

    Dianann

    Member
    Korean
    Further to grassy's point,
    1) I could do with a little help from you -> this is informal and is also used with an annoyed tone of voice when you think that the person should be helping you, but they are not helping you.

    A: John! You can see that I am having difficulty translating this, and I know that you speak the language - I could do with some help from you.

    2) I would appreciate your help in translating~~ -> this is a polite request.
    Hello PaulQ!
    I really appreciate for your threat!
    It answered eveything what I was wondering about:thumbsup:
     

    Dianann

    Member
    Korean
    'Could do with' is casual and colloquial. The other is formal in speech and might be more suitable talking to a superior.

    (The form 'gonna' is extremely casual and should not be used in writing except in chat rooms and suchlike)
    Hermione! Your reply is really helpful!
    Now I know each situation which certain one should I use!

    Thank you for your help!!
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I really appreciate for your threat!
    :D
    Threat -> WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
    threat (thret), n.
    1. a declaration of an intention or determination to inflict punishment, injury, etc., in retaliation for, or conditionally upon, some action or course;
      menace:He confessed under the threat of imprisonment.
    2. an indication or warning of probable trouble:The threat of a storm was in the air.
    3. a person or thing that threatens.
    Thread -> WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
    thread (thred), n.
    10. a series of posts on a newsgroup dealing with the same subject.
     

    Dianann

    Member
    Korean
    :D
    Threat -> WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
    threat (thret), n.
    1. a declaration of an intention or determination to inflict punishment, injury, etc., in retaliation for, or conditionally upon, some action or course;
      menace:He confessed under the threat of imprisonment.
    2. an indication or warning of probable trouble:The threat of a storm was in the air.
    3. a person or thing that threatens.
    Thread -> WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
    thread (thred), n.
    10. a series of posts on a newsgroup dealing with the same subject.
    Hehe
    I am sorry for causing this!!
    I thank for what is not usually supposed to be thankful — threat hehe

    Thank you for your thread!!!:D
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "I could do with some help from you" doesn't have to be only in an annoying situation.

    A: This job I volunteered for turned out to be bigger than I thought. I could do with some help from you if you're available.

    B: Sorry, I can't tonight. But I'm free tomorrow.
     

    Dianann

    Member
    Korean
    "I could do with some help from you" doesn't have to be only in an annoying situation.

    A: This job I volunteered for turned out to be bigger than I thought. I could do with some help from you if you're available.

    B: Sorry, I can't tonight. But I'm free tomorrow.
    Thank you for your reply!
    It gave some more hints.

    Let’s say Lisa and I are friend.
    And I really need her babysitting on saturday since I have to go work

    A) Lisa. The project I am doing turns out to not end until this weekend. I could do with some help from you (if you’re available)

    B) okay. When is it again?

    Do you think it is correct to say like above?

    If I attach (if you’re available) it probably sounds better and works good for asking some help?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's okay with me. And definitely a good idea to add "if you are available" to make it a polite request.
     

    This_Is_Patrick

    Senior Member
    Parsi
    What about the following scenario: (taken from English Collocation in Use Book)
    (Jane and Ron are looking for somewhere to eat)

    Jane: Let's find a café and have a quick snack. And I could really do with a refreshing drink.
    Ron: I'm dying of hunger! ...

    What is the meaning of the bold part?
    Thanks!
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I could [really] do with... -> I have a [great] need for... ('Really' is simply an emphatic.)

    See also #2 and #3 above.
     
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