I could draw its form here and <little Em'ly springing forward to her destruction, directed to sea>

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The protagonist recalls his childhood.
He and Peggotty, the only maid of his house came to Yarmouth, her hometown and visited her brother, Mr. Peggotty's house.
Em'ly is Mr. Peggotty's cousin, whose father was drown-dead.

She started from my side, and ran along a jagged timber which protruded from the place we stood upon, and overhung the deep water at some height without the least defence. The incident is so impressed on my remembrance that, if I were a draughtsman, I could draw its form here, I dare say, accurately as it was that day, and little Em'ly springing forward to her destruction (as it appeared to me), with a look that I have never forgotten, directed far out to sea.
The light, bold, fluttering little figure turned and came back safe to me, and I soon laughed at my fears, and at the cry I had uttered, fruitlessly in any case, for there was no one near.
[David Copperfield by Charles Dickens]
I'd like to know if the gerund phrase "little Em'ly springing forward to her destruction, directed far out to sea" is the object of "draw."
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    It's difficult. I feel that the object of "draw" is "its form". The latter part of the sentence seems more to be just adding some detail to the scene and the way it occurred.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, perpend, for your very helpful answer.:)
    Then I'd like to know why you think there is "and" before "little Em'ly."
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Then, I'd like to know if it is possible both "I could draw its form here" and "little Em'ly springing forward to her destruction directed far out to sea." are objects of "dare say."
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    The "and" before "little Em'ly" bothers me a little. :) I was going to comment on that above, but thought it would be too confusing.

    Since you notice it too (that's a good thing), I would expect "with" instead of "and" before "little Em'ly". (I have to think about your other question.)
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    A) The incident is so impressed on my remembrance that, if I were a draughtsman, I could draw its form here, I dare say, accurately as it was that day, and little Em'ly springing forward to her destruction (as it appeared to me), with a look that I have never forgotten, directed far out to sea.

    I had to pull "I dare say" forward to the beginning, to think about this (I took it out of the middle):

    B) I dare say (that) the incident is so impressed on my remembrance that, if I were a draughtsman, I could draw its form here, accurately as it was that day, and little Em'ly springing forward to her destruction (as it appeared to me), with a look that I have never forgotten, directed far out to sea.

    Hmmm ... I don't know if they are objects of "I dare say ...", but that's a good observation, PSJ. I still would prefer "with" before "little Em'ly".

    In B, I think after "I dare say (that) ...", it's a monster run-on clause of some type.

    It's an extremely long sentence for English, in my opinion! Let's wait to hear from others. :)
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    If he were a draughtsman he could depict (draw) her image as well as the act of her jumping out to sea where she would find her destruction. (She did not jump, he only imagined it. Her form was real, however.)
     
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