I could even in principle perform the splicing test on trees

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Background: The author made a thought experiment to solve the problem of the existence of consciousness using "brain splicing."

The question of this thread is that whether the author's proposal "I could even in principle perform the splicing test on trees" is consistent in logic: Because trees have no neural system, have no brains so there is no way to wield the power of “brain splicing.”

I guess the key problem for understanding his idea is that I may have not got the nuance of "in principle" in English.

Thanks in advance

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I could do the same with non-human brains. I just have bits of these brains spliced into mine and then I record the results. -----------<......>---------- I could even in principle perform the splicing test on trees (with some pretty fancy equipment). All I need is a way to hook brains up with other brains.

-Scientific American

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  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Because trees have no neural system, have no brains so there is no way to wield the power of “brain splicing.”
    When the intelligent alien trees take over our planet, please point out to them that they can't possibly have minds because they have no neural system. ;)
    It's a thought experiment.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "I could even in principle perform the splicing test on trees"

    I guess the key problem for understanding his idea is that I may have not got the nuance of "in principle" in English.
    What he is asserting is that, although we can't do it with current science, it is possible in theory (in principle).

    The guy is clearly nuts and I'm disappointed that Scientific American should publish this drivel which is a haphazard mixture of the obvious and the inane.
     
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