i could see my name carved in his knife

dumark_

Senior Member
español
Hola, tengo una duda con esta frase"And from behind a tree,i could see my name carved in his knife"

¿se puede interpretar que el grabado/tallado del nombre estaba en el árbol o estaba en el cuchillo")

1-y detrás de un árbol pude ver mi nombre grabado de su cuchillo
2-y detrás de un árbol pude ver mi nombre grabado en su cuchillo


Muchas gracias
 
  • Lis48

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Presumably it´s the song lyrics so is actually carved in his knife.
    http://lyrics.edson.cl/ver.php?print=168
    The usually expression is "There is a bullet with your name on it" meaning "You are going to die!"
    Here, it is the knife that has his name written on it, so it means he thinks he is about to be stabbed.
    y detrás de un árbol pude ver mi nombre grabado en su cuchillo

     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left six years ago
    Que estaba en el cuchillo = in his knife
    Que estaba en el árbol = in the tree, with his knife
    Y si fuera en el árbol, ¿no podría ser además 'my name carved on a/the tree' en lugar de 'in', por favor?

    Saludos.
     

    kayokid

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Hello. In my mind, names, initials, hearts, etc. are carved into (or in) a tree.

    And I tend to agree with the interpretation that the meaning of the lyric is that the name was carved into (the bark of) the tree in a style that was obviously his. That is, as fenixpollo said, in(to) the tree with his knife.
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left six years ago
    Thank you, Kayokid.

    I think it was a silly question, sorry; I think I understand now: you carve a name on a tree but a name is carved in it, right?

    Un saludo.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    It wouldn't be wrong to say that the name was carved on the tree. If you want to get technical, then you could say that the name is carved on the tree because the name is on the outside of the tree; and that the name is carved in the bark of the tree because it has been etched into the bark.

    However, the most common preposition with carved, in this case, is "in" or "into".
     

    kayokid

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Thank you, Kayokid.

    I think it was a silly question, sorry; I think I understand now: you carve a name on a tree but a name is carved in it, right?

    Un saludo.
    This is not a silly question at all.

    I'm sitting here saying this sentence with every English preposition and one minute they all sound correct and the next minute they all sound terrible!

    In my opinion, I would say:
    You carve your sweetheart's name/initials in or into a tree. I can see the possibility of saying 'on' here but it would not be my first choice.
    After you put the knife away, the name, etc. is carved in, into or on the tree. (My preference is in that order.)
     

    mijoch

    Banned
    British English
    "De detras de un arbol, veía mi nombre tallado en su cuchillo"----Why complicate it so?

    Bit like the English----"I saw my name on his bullet".

    M.
     
    Hi -

    This is not a silly question at all.

    I'm sitting here saying this sentence with every English preposition and one minute they all sound correct and the next minute they all sound terrible!

    In my opinion, I would say:
    You carve your sweetheart's name/initials in or into a tree. I can see the possibility of saying 'on' here but it would not be my first choice.
    After you put the knife away, the name, etc. is carved in, into or on the tree. (My preference is in that order.)
    I fully agree, in the first place, there is nothing silly about the question, and secondly, all three sound correct to me. Like Kayokid, I have been saying it over and over with the different prepositions to see which sounds best.

    The only difference is that my preference (in both cases) would be into, on, in, in that order. So you can take your choice, Blasita!
     

    mijoch

    Banned
    British English
    "He was looking for me and from behind a tree I could see that his intention was to stick that knife in me."

    "I could see that my name was carved in his knife".

    Don't get pernickety about prepositions. See the meaning.

    M.
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left six years ago
    The only difference is that my preference (in both cases) would be into, on, in, in that order. So you can take your choice, Blasita!
    Thanks, Serrenna!

    Mijoch, lo siento, pero las preposiciones son difíciles para mí -como también para otros hispanohablantes, que creo que se pueden beneficiar también de vuestras respuestas.

    Con respecto a la traducción de la frase de Dumark, hay bastantes posibilidades, pero mi opinión es que su traducción (la segunda oración, claro) está bien; si se quisiera añadir una preposición, yo añadiría mejor 'desde' ('desde detrás').

    Un saludo a todos.
     

    mijoch

    Banned
    British English
    Blasita

    No me ha molestado nada. The form in English is quite common. To have someone's name carved on a bullet/knife/whatever is figurative and means to try to kill him/her. I don't know if this works so in Spanish. I suspect not from the posts about "carved in/on some tree".

    M.
     

    Lis48

    Senior Member
    English - British
    "He was looking for me and from behind a tree I could see that his intention was to stick that knife in me."

    "I could see that my name was carved in his knife".

    Don't get pernickety about prepositions. See the meaning.

    M.
    That´s what I posted earlier on with the same explanation of "bullet with a name on it." But I then deleted it.
    If you read the lyrics, it is very clear that the name is written in the tree with the knife. The words are just shortened with poetic licence or probably an "in" misheard for a "with."
    The man has no intention to stick his knife in her because she has already killed him first and she is standing behind the tree looking at the contrast of his body on the ground and her name carved in the tree showing the love he had once for her. She has stabbed him because he betrayed her with "his whore" whom she had killed earlier.
    A love story gone wrong!
     

    mijoch

    Banned
    British English
    I've seen now the lyrics.

    There's nothing in it about a name carved in a tree.

    It mentions her "stilletos (plural) sunk in the ground"
    She killed him before he killed her-------She could see her name in his knife (before he managed to kill her).

    If all this is some sort of English, the only meaning I can give to "I could see my name in his knife" is that he intended to kill her, but she killed him first with her "stilettos".

    But is Christian Death English, English?

    M.
     
    Last edited:

    Lis48

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I've seen now the lyrics.

    There's nothing in it about a name carved in a tree. No but that suggests itself from the story of his having loved her and then found someone else. Symbolic of a past love.
    It mentions her "stilletos (plural) sunk in the ground" I read this as the marks of her stilettos when she was stabbing him. Now she is behind the tree looking on from afar.
    M.
    My first reaction ( see my post 4) was that it meant he was trying to kill her so she retaliated. Then I reread the lyrics and decided it referred to a reflection on the knife from the carved name in the tree. My image is that she has stabbed him to death leaving marks of her stilleto heels in the mud. She goes behind a tree and looks at his body and what she has done, holding the knife in her hand. The carving of her name on the tree is reflected in the blade of her knife...the past love and the present hatred etc.
    "I killed you before you killed me" to me means she killed him before he could hurt her any more. Not as literally as you have taken it! :)
     
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