I could slop her up with a biscuit

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chopin7

Senior Member
Albanian
Hello

Two men are talking about girls.
One is looking the photo of the supposed
girlfriend of the other and says,
"Nice. Very nice. Table grade. I could slop her up with a biscuit."


I don't understand this "slop up with a biscuit".
And as I saw on net, "table grade" doesn't

correspond to "nice, very nice".
What it might be this "slop up"? I could eat her up?
From his voice, it is very obvious the sexual tone.


Thank you
 
  • Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I agree with pops that you found the right meaning of "slop her up...".


    By the way, you might consider opening a new topic on "table grade", as I'm not sure you are correct about this, but we cannot discuss it here as it is a separate topic.
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    I have never heard it before. But that means I don't talk like that, either. So, it could be it is common in America, but not to my knowledge or experience. It almost sounds like a "good ol' boy" southern expression (suspiciously so).
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    It's unlikely to be current in the UK as we don't use biscuit in the US sense used here (that is, as a kind of savoury bread cake). We may dip biscuits (cookies) into tea and coffee, but this really doesn't work as a metaphor in the same way, as the impression is that the girl is "gravy" and is entirely soaked up and eaten with the biscuit.

    However, I think it is instantly understandable as the equivalent of saying "I could eat her up". I don't think it's a particularly common idiom, although it has an obviousness about it that indicates that it might be spontaneously invented and reinvented as well as being passed on.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    It sounds like a variation of another food idiom:

    "I could eat you (her/him) up with a spoon."

    Both easily understandable.
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    Not too sure about your side of the pond, Mole. But here in the US if something (particularly a child/infant) evoked a lot of passion, it was common to say, "I could just eat you up!". Due to the obvious evolution of such terms/language, and other reasons, it has fallen out of usage. Rarely is it ever seen unless in drama or storylines from a past era.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Not too sure about your side of the pond, Mole. But here in the US if something (particularly a child/infant) evoked a lot of passion, it was common to say, "I could just eat you up!". Due to the obvious evolution of such terms/language, and other reasons, it has fallen out of usage. Rarely is it ever seen unless in drama or storylines from a past era.
    I think it is pretty much the same in the UK, including reasons for its falling out of fashion. I also noted the "biscuit" version used in reference to a cute child, in exactly the same way, which one might consider rather naive.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    In my experience, you "sop" gravy (or other liquids) up with a biscuit, not "slop".
    Maybe the writer was trying to use a word that was less polite.

    Slop makes me think the guy wants to gobble her up as fast as he can. It reminds me of yet another food idiom that is tied to this thread:

    "I could just gobble you (her/him) up."

    In fact, the more I read chopin's post, it's apparent these two guys are not strict gentlemen. The very fact that the one would speak so openly/somewhat rudely about his reaction to his friend's girlfriend shows that.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I know, Myridon, but it is a looser term, I suspect. Sopping is actually a good table manner. Christ sopped with his disciples. I think slop was used intentionally.
    No, that is "sup" - Christ supped with his disciples. Sopping things up with a biscuit is bad table manners. By the way, is there such a thing as "a table manner"?
    From Merriam-Webster:
    sop
    1a: to steep or dip in or as if in liquid b: to wet thoroughly : soak
    sup
    1: to eat the evening meal
    2: to make one's supper —used with on or off <sup on roast beef>
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    No, that is "sup" - Christ supped with his disciples. Sopping things up with a biscuit is bad table manners. By the way, is there such a thing as "a table manner"?
    From Merriam-Webster:
    In case you want to refresh your memory:
    Jesus answered, He it is, to whom I shall give a sop, when I have dipped it. And when he had dipped the sop, he gave it to Judas Iscariot, the son of Simon.(John 13:26)

    Table manners? Heavens yes! Bad? No!
    Please don't take offense. I was agreeing with you as to the preferrence in sopping over slopping. Why I said, I know!
     
    Last edited:

    chopin7

    Senior Member
    Albanian
    Thank you very much to all.
    And sorry I didn't wrote it is the movie "The messenger".
    The guys are american officers and they are chatting in a bar.
     
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