I could slop you up with a biscuit.

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csicska

Senior Member
hungarian
Hello. I was watching several videos of southern US expressions and come across "You're so hot I could slop you up with a biscuit". I have to admit now that I have no idea what I should picture when hearing this phrase. Could somebody please help me? It was said by the woman below. Thank you.

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  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    In the south, people often serve biscuits and gravy. They use the biscuits to soak up the gravy and eat it; it amounts to wiping the gravy up off the plate with the biscuit. I would use the verb 'sop' to describe this action. Perhaps this young lady misheard the word -- or perhaps they say 'slop' where she comes from.

    Some people would find this rude, but in other places it's a way to show how much you like the cooking. If a gravy is exceptionally delicious, sopping it up with your biscuit is a way to get every last bit of it.

    In this case 'hot' means sexually appealing. The woman is saying that she finds the other person so appealing that she could 'consume' every bit of them.

    I hadn't heard this before, but it turns out this is popular saying, at least on the Internet:
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    In essence, this is a more richly detailed and colorful (and geographically or culturally specific) way of saying "I could eat you up," which is obviously also a figurative usage.
     

    csicska

    Senior Member
    hungarian
    Thank you. Would there be a huge literal difference between "sop" and "slop"? There seem to be examples with "slop" as well so maybe it's a regional thing.


    Sweet Cheeks you look so yummy you should let me put you on a plate and slop you up with a biscuit - Facebook-Chris Troester - Sweet Cheeks
    I'd slop you up with a biscuit if you wasn't married chuchu - ThisCrush - eastst's Crush Page


     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    In this context there is no difference. While both words have association with food, eating, and liquids, "sop" is the one that best applies to eating in polite company, at least when biscuits and gravy are involved. "Slop" can have less savory connotations.
     
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