I couldn't go because I fell off my horse one day and broke my leg.

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maxscy

Member
Cantonese
'I couldn't go because I fell off my horse one day and broke my leg.'

why the writer didn't write "I couldn't go because I fell off from my horse one day and broke my leg."

I feel a bit strange for missing the word, but I'm not sure if my thought is wrong.
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I don't think we do add "from" to any of those verbs.

    Some people add an unnecessary of, as in I fell off of my horse; I got off of the bus; I took the cover off of the dish. It isn't considered good style, but you may hear native speakers using it. There are some previous threads on that usage.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Wwhy didn't the writer didn't write "I couldn't go because I fell off from my horse one day and broke my leg."?
    The word "off" already conveys the idea of movement away from the horse.
    off (WR dictionary): in a direction that is away from a place: to look off toward the west.
    There's therefore no need for "from".

    And similarly you could just say "fell from my horse" without "off", as #2 says.
     
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