I demand you to go / I demand that you go [subjunctive, infinitive]

Ilyana

Senior Member
Russian
Hello!

I know that we can use subjunctive with the verb "demand":
I demand (that) you (should) stay here.

However, I couldn't find clear information about infinitive usage (with and without pronouns between the verb and this construction).. Are these below correct?

I demand you to stay here.
I demand to stay here (in the meaning of "I demand that we should stay here").

(I know that gerund is forbidden with "demand")

Thanks in advance)
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I demand you to stay here. :cross: You can't demand anything to do anything. You could say 'I command . . . ' here, or 'I ask . . . ', or 'I told . . . '.

    I demand to stay here. :tick:
     

    Embonpoint

    Senior Member
    English--American
    I would say, in American English:
    I demand that you stay here.
    I demand that you let me stay here. (I'm not leaving and don't try to make me!)

    On your sentences:
    I demand that you should stay here. :warning: Strange to me in AE. Wouldn't say it's wrong but would never say it.
    I demand you to stay here. :cross:
    I demand to stay here (in the meaning of "I demand that we should stay here"). :warning: Fine grammatically but a bit odd to me because usually you demand something (a fair trial!) or that someone else do something. Perhaps clearer here is: I demand that you allow me to stay here.

    I see you are working through a lot of verbs that express that you want someone to do something and seeing if each one can be used with an infinitive. The only verbs I can think of that take an infinitive are: would like, beg, implore. I would like you to stay here. I beg you to clean your room. I'm not sure why you can use some verbs with the infinitive and others not. Maybe someone can clear that up!
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I demand you to stay here. :cross: You can't demand anything to do anything. You could say 'I command . . . ' here, or 'I ask . . . ', or 'I told . . . '.

    I demand to stay here. :tick:

    What about this title: Is Society Demanding Children to Read Too Early? By Clara Yoder.
    Is it just an exception? Does the word demand have different meaning in that title?
    As far as rules are concerned I learned that "demand" belongs to "verbs followed by a to-infinitive or a that-clause. (According to Longman English Grammar by L.G. Alexander, p. 307. Other verbs: agree, beg, decide, determine, expect, hope, learn, prefer, wish.)
     
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    Embonpoint

    Senior Member
    English--American
    I did look up that Clara Yoder text on Google. I am not sure who the writer is, but there are a number of awkward and ungrammatical usages throughout the text and I would not use it as a model of correct English. Some native speakers are sorely in need of good editors!

    For that sentence I would say:
    Is society demanding that children read too early?
    Or, even better: Is society pushing children to read too early?
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I did look up that Clara Yoder text on Google. I am not sure who the writer is, but there are a number of awkward and ungrammatical usages throughout the text and I would not use it as a model of correct English. Some native speakers are sorely in need of good editors!

    For that sentence I would say:
    Is society demanding that children read too early?
    Or, even better: Is society pushing children to read too early?
    Thank you, Embonpoint. I guess the author meant something else.
     

    Embonpoint

    Senior Member
    English--American
    I don't think the author meant something else. I think she simply doesn't have a good editor. We all make mistakes in writing and if there isn't a professional editor, things slip through.
     

    slovac

    Senior Member
    << Merged with previous thread. >>

    Could you tell me whether there is a difference in meaning between the sentence number 1 and the sentence number 2?

    I demand you to go (1)
    I demand that you go (2)

    Thank you.
     
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