I did not believe.., but < neither/nor > did I

Hello! Is the usage of "neither" instead of "nor" correct in these sentences? :

"I did not believe his story, but nor did I believe hers."

"He didn't deny the reports, but nor did he confirm them."


Because I found these two sentences in pages with the definition of "neither":

"I did not believe his story, but neither did I believe hers."

The link to this sentence (conjunction, definition 2 for "neither")

"He didn't deny the reports, but neither did he confirm them."

The link to this (the last sentence in the "More examples" section

Or just the usage of "nor" is actually correct here? Please help!

Thank you in advance!
 
  • CaptainZero

    Senior Member
    English, with possible Australianisms
    Yes, you can delete "but" from your "neither" sentences, but it's okay to leave it in. As bananoo and Forero have suggested, "but" should not be included in your "nor" sentences.
     
    Yes, you can delete "but" from your "neither" sentences, but it's okay to leave it in. As bananoo and Forero have suggested, "but" should not be included in your "nor" sentences.
    So this sentence is perfectly correct, right? :
    "He hadn’t done any homework, neither had he brought any of his books to class."

    Also, is "nor" used just as often as "neither" or "but neither" in this case? Is there a difference in terms of how formal they are?
     
    Last edited:

    Forero

    Senior Member
    So this sentence is perfectly correct, right? :
    "He hadn’t done any homework, neither had he brought any of his books to class."

    Also, is "nor" used just as often as "neither" or "but neither" in this case? Is there a difference in terms of how formal they are?
    Neither is not a coordinating conjunction, so splicing it onto something with a comma does not work:

    He hadn’t done any homework. Neither had he brought any of his books to class.:tick:
    He hadn’t done any homework; neither had he brought any of his books to class.:tick:
    He hadn’t done any homework, neither had he brought any of his books to class.:cross:
     
    Neither is not a coordinating conjunction, so splicing it onto something with a comma does not work:

    He hadn’t done any homework. Neither had he brought any of his books to class.:tick:
    He hadn’t done any homework; neither had he brought any of his books to class.:tick:
    He hadn’t done any homework, neither had he brought any of his books to class.:cross:
    Thank you for your response, but if you go here (at "Not with neither and nor" section) you can see that they show on their site the contrary of what you said. May it be a difference between British and American English?
     
    The sentences with neither seem fine! However I would remove the "but" from the sentences with nor.
    Yes, you can delete "but" from your "neither" sentences, but it's okay to leave it in. As bananoo and Forero have suggested, "but" should not be included in your "nor" sentences.
    So, does it mean that apart from the usage of the phrase "but nor", you, British English speakers, don't agree with the usage of the phrase "and nor" either?
    I found this phrase on many dictionaries like this one (2nd def) or this one (2nd def, 2nd ex) or this one (2nd def).
    "I can't be at the meeting and nor can Andrew."
    "I don't want to see him go and nor do the fans."
    "She doesn't like them and nor does Jeff."


    So, is the usage of "and nor" grammatical in these sentences?
     
    Last edited:
    Top