I did not give utterance to this conviction

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Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
The quotation comes from Charlotte Brontë – Jane Eyre (Chap. 27) | Genius

Quotation: "I felt the truth of these words; and I drew from them the certain inference, that if I were so far to forget myself and all the teaching that had ever been instilled into me, as—under any pretext—with any justification—through any temptation—to become the successor of these poor girls, he would one day regard me with the same feeling which now in his mind desecrated their memory. I did not give utterance to this conviction: it was enough to feel it. I impressed it on my heart, that it might remain there to serve me as aid in the time of trial.

Context: Mr. R had told Jane about his mistresses. He talked "of it as a mere matter of course".
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Hi everyone! I don't quite understand the bold sentence. I try to interpret it as below. Is it correct?

conviction => a fixed or firm belief
the sentence => I didn't speak out what I firmly believed (that if I were so far to .... he would one day regard me with the same feeling which now in his mind desecrated their memory).
 
  • Irelia20150604

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    :idea: Thank you. I'm not sure understand your explanation. Do you mean:

    it = if I were so far to .... he would one day regard me with the same feeling which now in his mind desecrated their memory
    to feel => to have a belief in; think

    the sentence => she did not spell it out - she just believed in it.
     
    I think she "felt" that "certain inference, that if I were so far to forget myself and all the teaching that had ever been instilled into me, as—under any pretext—with any justification—through any temptation—to become the successor of these poor girls, he would one day regard me with the same feeling which now in his mind desecrated their memory", but that (rather wordy) description of her feeling was not expressed in so many words at the time.
     
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