I did not like her the worse for that;

sampathronjay

Senior Member
Sinhala
Explain what is in bold please...

‘She is Mr. Rochester’s ward; he commissioned me to
find a governess for her. He intended to have her brought
up in -shire, I believe. Here she comes, with her ‘bonne,’
as she calls her nurse.’ The enigma then was explained:
this affable and kind little widow was no great dame; but a
dependant like myself. I did not like her the worse for
that;
on the contrary, I felt better pleased than ever. The
equality between her and me was real; not the mere result
of condescension on her part: so much the better—my
position was all the freer.

Jane Eyre - Chapter 11
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I did not like her the worse for that; on the contrary, I felt better pleased than ever.

    I did not like her the worst worse - does literally mean that I didn't think any worse of her, but it can be used as a (rather outdated) way of saying that I approved of her even more; I liked her all the more for that. It's an example of understatement.
     
    Last edited:

    sampathronjay

    Senior Member
    Sinhala
    I did not like her the worse for that; on the contrary, I felt better pleased than ever.

    I did not like her the worst- does literally mean that I didn't think any worse of her, but it can be used as a (rather outdated) way of saying that I approved of her even more; I liked her all the more for that. It's an example of understatement.
    :thumbsup:
     
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