I disgust her. ~ 'She' is filled with disgust.

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SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
I love her. ~ I am filled with love.
I despise him. ~ I am filled with despising.

I disgust her. ~ She is filled with disgust.

Can someone explain to me why the verb 'to disgust' is left out of the 'team' of other verbs?

Thanks.
 
  • grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    There are plenty of other verbs that follow this pattern.

    I repel her. She is filled with repulsion.

    I please her. She is filled with pleasure.


    etc.

    All these are verbs that produce a sensation in 'her'.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    I don't know who is on the "team" or what game they are playing, but if yoiu are asking about the replacement of a verb with "filled with" and a noun, then "despise" does not belong here. "Despising" is a gerund, not a noun, and "filled with despising" does not look idiomatic to me. I can't think of a real noun equivalent for despise, although there is an adjective (despicable).
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I love her. ~ I am filled with love.
    I despise him. ~ I am filled with despising.

    I disgust her. ~ She is filled with disgust.

    Can someone explain to me why the verb 'to disgust' is left out of the 'team' of other verbs?

    Thanks.
    Interesting question! Some other languages tend to use an indirect pronoun to reflect this - but I agree with you, it does seem a bit incongruous in English. I can't think of any way of knowing other than learning it by rote. I suppose you could consider "to disgust" as meaning "to cause disgust". For example, to contrast your "I love her" phrase we also have "to enflame" which means "to fill with desire/love".
     

    SuprunP

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian & Russian
    Thank you, all!

    For some reason I didn't think of 'to please', which falls under the same category, as standing outside other verbs. :)
     

    SuprunP

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian & Russian
    "Despising" is a gerund, not a noun, and "filled with despising" does not look idiomatic to me. I can't think of a real noun equivalent for despise, although there is an adjective (despicable).
    Although it might not sound idiomatic to you my dictionaries tell me this:

    despising, vbl. n.
    The action of the vb. despise; contempt, scorn.
    1681–6 J. Scott Chr. Life (1747) III. 391 The despising of him was a despising of God, by whom he was sent.
    OED
    despising
    noun
    a feeling of scornful hatred
    •Syn: ↑ despisal

    WordNet® 3.0
    But I must confess, I've used this word for the first time in my life and only for the specific purpose of showing an emotion which a person is filled with, a real noun equivalent for despise having been of no importance to me at the moment.
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    As you see, the word "despising" is dated to the seventeenth century. It is not current English.

    I've never heard "despisal".
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    The noun from "to despise" is "despite"

    despite noun /diˈspīt/ 
    Outrage; injury- the despite done by him to the holy relics
    Contempt; disdain - the theater only earns my despite
    http://www.google.co.uk/search?aq=f...gc.r_pw.&fp=4bd1951a223e467a&biw=1920&bih=979
    I think it's only fair if you link to a dictionary definition like this to point out that this word is very uncommon. Well - I suppose I should say it seems very uncommon to me. Don't think I've heard of it before.
     
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