I don't sit in while you're running it down

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Agito a42, Sep 14, 2017 at 3:32 AM.

  1. Agito a42

    Agito a42 Senior Member

    Russian
    Source: Drive (2011), an American crime thriller film.

    A wheelman to robbers: You tell me where we start, where we're going, where we're going afterwards - I give you five minutes when we get there. Anything happens in that five minutes, and I'm yours, no matter what; anything a minute either side of that and you're on your own. I don't sit in while you're running it down, I don't carry a gun, I drive.

    I was wondering if you could explain the sentence in bold to me. What do "sit in" and "run it down" mean?
     
  2. dojibear Senior Member

    Fresno CA
    English - America
    Here "sit in" means "participate" and "running it down" means whatever they do inside the <place they are robbing>".

    He says that is not his job. His job is to wait in the car for five minutes, then leave. The bold part is just repeating what was said before.
     
  3. Agito a42

    Agito a42 Senior Member

    Russian
    So one could say "I'll sit in on a hold-up" to mean that he is going to actually participate in the robbery, play an active role in it, not just be there, watch, or observe it?

    As for the "running it down" bit, I'm still unclear. Are you saying that 'it' refers to the place they are going to rob?
     
  4. dojibear Senior Member

    Fresno CA
    English - America
    He will not be there to watch or observe it. He will be outside, in the car, with the motor running. The robbery will take place in the bank (or store: whatever is being robbed). He will see nothing, until they run out and jump in the car.

    But it's an odd thing to say. He says it, and I understand him, but I would not use "sit in on" when talking about a robbery. Normally one "sits in on" a meeting, or a card game, or something else where everyone is sitting while doing something: I will sit and do it too. That is how "sit in on" is normally used.

    No, "it" refers to the robbery. "Running it down" means "doing it". But that is an odd expression too.
     
  5. Agito a42

    Agito a42 Senior Member

    Russian
    Although I used "one" in the sense of "any person or thing" here, I got your explanation, dojibear. Thank you.
     

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