I eat salty food.

newname

Senior Member
Vietnamese
Hi,

First all all, here's the context:

An X man is invited to dinner. As this person is used to eating food with a lot of salt, what would he tell the host:

1. Please, add plenty of salt. I eat food very salty.
2. Please, add plenty of salt. I eat very salty food.

I'd appreciate an idiomatic version.

Thank you very much.

P.S.
And in a reverse situation where you eat food with little salt and your host eats food with lots of salt, what would you idiomatically tell the host?
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think we're mixing language and culture. As a guest, you wouldn't tell the host how to cook the food. You would either reach for the salt shaker or bring your own. If you had to say something that breaks this etiquette, then use #1, or this:

    Please add plenty of salt. I like my food salty.

    In the reverse situation, I would say, "Thank you, but I really can't stay for dinner. I have a previous engagement."
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would say something like 'I prefer my food salty' or 'I prefer more salt in my food', or 'I prefer salty food'.

    And conversely, 'I prefer my food less salty'.

    There are many ways to express the same thing - these are just a few . . .
     

    newname

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    Many thanks,

    In fact, my mum cooks for all of us and she always adds lots of salt to our food. She's so perverse that she never tastes the food when she adds salt. When the food is not salty, I just add more salt or fish sauce. But when the food is salty, you know how bad the food tastes with more water added later.

    Is it fine if I tell her, 'Mum, I want the food unsalty. It's good for our hearts'

    Thank you.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Ah, that's a totally different context. ;)

    Maybe, "Mum, please don't salt the food – that way we can each add what we like. Besides, it's good for our hearts and we want you with us forever."
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    'I want . . .' sounds a bit demanding. How about 'Please don't put so much salt in the food. It's bad for your heart'?

    (Here 'your' doesn't imply your mum's heart; it implies everybody's heart. It's like saying 'one's heart, but it's a bit more idiomatic.)
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Here, at least, what you say to your mother about how she cooks your food at home is not the same as you might say to your host when you're having dinner at someone else's home. Here, it would be considered rude to ask someone to cook a particular way, unless there is a medical reason for your request. It's perfectly fine to say something like, "I have to ask you to be sure that you don't include nuts in any dishes you serve me, since I have a severe allergy to them."
     
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