... I end up worrying about what I have done.

Shweggeh

Senior Member
Lithuanian (not certain)
"I tend to overthink a lot, but once I've agreed on (doing) something I usually end up worrying about what I have done either way"

This is getting ridiculous but I'm paranoid over this being grammatically incorrect. Is it though?
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    It doesn't make sense to me. Is "(doing)" part of the sentence, or a comment you added to explain the sentence? And "either way" refers to 2 things, but I don't see 2 things mentioned.
     

    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I think I can discern some confused meaning here. Perhaps it is something like:

    I tend to overthink things to the extent that, even once I have settled upon a plan of action, I still worry about the alternatives.​
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "Once" is probably what confused me. "Once" doesn't work here. "Once" means something starts then. But thinking about two choices never starts when you decide between them. In fact, it usually ends when you decide. But for you it "continues after" you decide.

    I think "even after" and "still continue" would make that meaning clearer:
    - for most people, deciding ends the action (thinking about both choices)
    - for you, even after you decide, you still continue the action (thinking about both choices)

    And but is mis-used. That confused me too. But means "what I say after but is opposite to what I said before but". In your example sentence, what you say after but is an example of what you say before but, not its opposite.
     

    Shweggeh

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian (not certain)
    Here's what I wanted to convey:
    I overthink so much so that once I've come up with the right course of action I still regret having done it at the end of the day whether or not I had chosen to do it.
    Does that make sense?
     
    Last edited:

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Not quite.

    You can't "regret having done it" unless you have done it. But you say "whether or not I had chosen to do it". Those two phrases have conflicting meanings.

    And "once I've <done something>" and "at the end of the day" are conflicting time phrases.
     

    Shweggeh

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian (not certain)
    Not quite.

    You can't "regret having done it" unless you have done it. But you say "whether or not I had chosen to do it". Those two phrases have conflicting meanings.

    And "once I've <done something>" and "at the end of the day" are conflicting time phrases.
    They are? How should I have said it then?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top