I expect to see him, hear from her, etc

LiveOn2Wheels

Senior Member
English, United States
I don't think this phrase translates "exactly" or literally in Italian. I believe either the verb aspettare or sperare should be used. However, I thought the main definition of aspettare was to wait, and the main one for sperare is to "hope for". SO... can someone tell me which one Italians more commonly use to express an expectation. My attempts would be:

"Aspetto vederlo a li." "Aspetto sentire da lei". Grazie a tutti!
 
  • Saoul

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Ciao Liveon2Wheels,

    the verb you are looking for is not so different. It is "aspettarsi". That translates quite well "to expect".

    Mi aspetto di vederlo...
    Mi aspetto di sentirla...

    What do you think?

    Saoul
     

    Mickele

    Senior Member
    Italian, Tuscany
    I don't think this phrase translates "exactly" or literally in Italian. I believe either the verb aspettare or sperare should be used. However, I thought the main definition of aspettare was to wait, and the main one for sperare is to "hope for". SO... can someone tell me which one Italians more commonly use to express an expectation. My attempts would be:

    "Aspetto vederlo a li." "Aspetto sentire da lei". Grazie a tutti!
    Ciao. Io la vedo così...

    Aspettare può essere un "falso amico" per i non nativi in quanto si traduce così sia "to expect" che "to wait (for)". Nel caso "Mi aspetto di sentirLa presto" può esserci -secondo me- anche un terzo significato ovvero: "to look forward (to)".

    More comments will probably follow... :)

    M/

    Ciao Liveon2Wheels,

    the verb you are looking for is not so different. It is "aspettarsi". That translates quite well "to expect".

    Mi aspetto di vederlo...
    Mi aspetto di sentirla...

    What do you think?

    Saoul
    :thumbsup: Quoto!

    M/
     

    LiveOn2Wheels

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Thanks Saoul, this verb is easier to remember also since it's closer to the English - I just never knew it could be reflexive. One more question - in my second example I said hear FROM her - does adding the pronoun to the end of the verb have different meanings depending on the verb? Vederlo = see him, Sentirlo = hear from her, not hear her?
     

    Saoul

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Thanks Saoul, this verb is easier to remember also since it's closer to the English - I just never knew it could be reflexive. One more question - in my second example I said hear FROM her - does adding the pronoun to the end of the verb have different meanings depending on the verb? Vederlo = see him, Sentirlo = hear from her, not hear her?
    I think your issue is not really about la at the end, but about the construction of the verb.

    In English you say "to hear from s.o." but in Italian we use the transitive form both for "to hear s.o." and "to hear from s.o.".
    The context is key as always, so in a sentence like the above, it is quite plain that you don't expect to hear her (no suprise since you are not deaf), but you do expect to hear from her.
    I don't know if I made it clearer, or confused things more.
    What do you think?
     
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