I failed for<he disturbed><his disturbing>me

sagar grammar

Senior Member
Namaste,
Dear members.
.
- I failed for _______ me in the exam hall.
a) him to disturb
b) his disturbing:confused:
c) he disturbed :confused:
d) because of his disturbing :cross:

I answered C but the book suggested it's B, and now they both look fine to me.
.
Could somebody help me get the difference between the two uses, where one or the other is preferred?
.
Thanks in advance. :)
 
  • Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    Hello Sagar,
    Why did you thought the answer could be "C"?:confused:
    Doesn't the combination of "for" and "he" sound odd to you?
    I failed for he disturbed me in the class.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    .
    It looked to me like;-
    "I failed for (=because) he disturbed me in the class."
    Yes, "for" can be used as meaning "because", but I don't think it can be used this way in your sentence.:( I'd say: I failed because he disturbed me in the class.
     

    SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    for introduces an untensed gerund (a verb that is not conjugated), which takes a pronoun as subject: I failed for his disturbing me in the hall
    because introduces a tensed verb (conjugated), with a subject pronoun: I failed because he disturbed me in the hall
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'd say that all the options are incorrect, sagar grammar:(.

    C would be grammatical if you added a comma, but it sounds very odd. D would work if you removed the word "for".

    It's a poor question.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'd say it has the same problem as C: it sounds very odd. There are quite a few threads on the use of "for" meaning "because": if you search on for because you'll find them, though you'll need to do some sifting.

    Here's something I wrote in one of those previous threads:

    Here's Michael Swan's explanation of conjunction "for" in Practical English Usage
    For introduces new information, but suggests that the reason is given as an afterthought. A for-clause could almost be in brackets. For-clauses never come at the beginning of sentences, and cannot stand alone. For, used in this sense, is most common in a formal written style.
    My recommendation: don't use "for" meaning "because". It's good to understand it, but it's never necessary to use it:).
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I agree with Loob.

    Your book doesn't sound very reliable to me but perhaps it teaches Indian English, which I gather has some features that are not accepted (or no longer accepted) in BE.
     
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