I [feel like/like/feel as if] a fool.

thuhoai

Senior Member
Vietnam
Hi, everyone.

The following sentences make me confused.

1.-I feel like a fool.
2.-I feel as if I am a fool.
3.-I like a fool.

Do they convey the same meaning?
Thanks,
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Sentence 2 is a not very common way of saying sentence 1.
    The meaning of sentence 3 is completely different. Like is a verb, as in I like fast cars.
     

    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    "I feel like a fool" is correct colloquial English. The implication is that " I have done something foolish and am embarrassed about it."
    "I feel as if I were a fool" is correct and more formal. (Were, not am) It would sound stilted in conversation.
    "I like a fool" has a completely different meaning.
     

    MikeNewYork

    Senior Member
    English-American
    "I feel like a fool" is correct colloquial English. The implication is that " I have done something foolish and am embarrassed about it."
    "I feel as if I were a fool" is correct and more formal. (Were, not am) It would sound stilted in conversation.
    "I like a fool" has a completely different meaning.
    I completely agree with your answer.
     
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