I feel like the best version of myself <around you>

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
Anna: Don't you dare doubt yourself. You have a gift and you know it.
If you start to doubt that because of me, Brian, I don't know what
I would do with my self.
Brian: I don't doubt myself because of you. I feel like the best version of
myself around you, and that makes me doubt everything else.
<Of the movie "Keeping the Faith>

I'd like to know I can interpret "I feel like the best version of myself around you" as "I feel like the best version of myself when being around you"
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hi, PSJ.
    I'd like to know I can interpret "I feel like the best version of myself around you" as "I feel like the best version of myself when being around you"
    Your understanding of the phrase is fine, but you really don't need "being" in that interpretation: I feel like the best version of myself around you = I feel like the best version of myself when I am around you. = ...when I am near you.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, owlman5, for your very helpful answer. :)
    I know we can omit the conjunction "whether" when it leaves "or," but I can't understand how "when" can be omitted.
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    I feel like the best version of myself [when I am] around you. = bracketed phrase may be omitted.

    Compare, "He feels happy [when he is] around her" bracketed phrase may be omitted.

    An adverbial clause is condensed. This is possible because 'around her' involves him

    Compare, "He feels happy [when the dog is] around Jack {Jack being his son}."
    Note this cannot be condensed to, "He feels happy around Jack."
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I also liked Benny's explanation, PSJ.

    Then, I'd like to know if I can omit "when" only if with "around."
    No. It is possible to omit "when I am" in other clauses: I feel like the best version of myself near you = ...when I am near you. I feel like the best version of myself in dangerous situations. = when I am in dangerous situations. (This meaning is possible.)

    Sometimes, the phrasal substitution is unclear: I'm happy with you. = ??? I am happy when I am with you? = You make me happy/content?

    It was okay to reduce the dependent clause in your first example to a prepositional phrase. "Around you" clearly meant "when I am around you." Other reductions aren't as clear.

    You'll probably have to consider various reductions individually, PSJ. Some of them will work and others will be strange or unclear. When you are in doubt, use the subordinate clause. It will always be clear: I am happy when I am at parties. :thumbsup: (The underlined clause is very clear) = I am happy at parties.:thumbsup:(This reduction is clear and normal.)
     
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