I felt a mixture of reverence and fear

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supermarioutd

Senior Member
Persian
Hello,

I want to say that I saw an elephant in nature. I was scared a little bit and at the same time I felt respect and admiration for the animal. Does this work? :


I was fortunate enough to come across a massive elephant in the wild. I felt a mixture of reverence and fear towards that giant.

Does this sentence work? If not please let me know how you would put it.

If there are better words I can use please let me know.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I’m personally not comfortable with the notion of feeling fear towards something, but I suppose it’s okay. It would of course be easy to avoid the word if you wanted to.
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I’m personally not comfortable with the notion of feeling fear towards something, but I suppose it’s okay. It would of course be easy to avoid the word if you wanted to.
    So how would you say it? It's important to underscore the fear factor. Is preposition the problem?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    If you fear "for" someone (or some animal), you are worried about their well-being. I fear for my son when he drives his car too fast.

    It's a little awkward when you choose words that require different prepositions:

    I felt a mixture of reverence for, and fear of, that giant.
    Face to face with that giant, I felt a mixture of reverence and fear.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    The way to get around the problem is to rephrase it so that no prepositions are required. For example:
    In the proximity of that giant, I felt a mixture of reverence and fear.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    I was fortunate enough to come across a massive elephant in the wild. I felt a mixture of reverence and fear towards that giant.
    You could just stop after "fear". From the previous sentence, the reader or listener would understand you meant it was because of the elephant.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I agree with Velisarius; "felt fear" works without the "towards". I think we are more likely fearful "of" than we are fearful "to".

    I led a group on a hike in the Colorado's Elk Mountains and when we rounded a bend I came face to face with an elk (smaller than an elephant, but still about 700 pounds and about six feet away).

    Face to face with the elk I felt fear, and later a sense of reverence for that giant.

     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I agree with Velisarius; "felt fear" works without the "towards". I think we are more likely fearful "of" than we are fearful "to".

    I led a group on a hike in the Colorado's Elk Mountains and when we rounded a bend I came face to face with an elk (smaller than an elephant, but still about 700 pounds and about six feet away).

    Face to face with the elk I felt fear, and later a sense of reverence for that giant.
    This is good too but later doesn't work for me. I want to suggest I experienced those two feelings simultaneously.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    This is good too but later doesn't work for me. I want to suggest I experienced those two feelings simultaneously.
    I guess I could not multi-task. I suspect that in situations where the fear is great and genuine,it pushes to the forefront and makes other feelings secondary. That might be my experience only, however.
     
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