I find I'm inclined to assign precisely <the opposite connotations> to...

  • srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    FumbleFingers is saying that to him/her "I'm in church" means "I'm in the building," while "I'm in the church" means "I'm in the congregation or ministry."
    Oerkelens had said "I'm in school" means "I'm in the student body," while "I'm in the school" means "I'm in the building."

    The role that "the" plays for FumbleFingers and "church" is opposite to what Oerkelens sees as the role of "the" for "school."

    Edit: Added the blue "in" missed in my first sentence.
     
    Last edited:

    Junwei Guo

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    FumbleFingers is saying that to him/her "I'm in church" means "I'm in the building," while "I'm the church" means "I'm in the congregation or ministry."
    Oerkelens had said "I'm in school" means "I'm in the student body," while "I'm in the school" means "I'm in the building."

    The role that "the" plays for FumbleFingers and "church" is opposite to what Oerkelens sees as the role of "the" for "school."
    Thanks for your help, which was much needed!
     
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