I for one / I, for one,

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Passau

Member
English (CaE/AmE)
I for one feel like dancing.

I, for one, feel like dancing.

Is setting off for one with commas preferred in formal writing? That's the impression I have but I am not certain. A search of googlebooks turned up plentiful examples of both I for one and I, for one,. Are there are any rules/guidelines that are the basis for which is used?

Passau
 
  • pitseleh

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Yes, you would use the commas because for one is not necessary information: you could write the sentence without for one and it would still convey the same meaning.
     

    cavaradossi

    Senior Member
    Italy; Italian, Romanesque and Napolitan
    Yes, you would use the commas because for one is not necessary information: you could write the sentence without for one and it would still convey the same meaning.
    Yes but what is the meaning of "I, for one,". Is it "I, for example, " or "I, on my side, "?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    :arrow:Response post above:
    Yes but what is the meaning of "I, for one,". Is it "I, for example, " or "I, on my side, "?
    It is closer to "I, for example." People often say "I, for one" to make it clear that they have a certain opinion, no matter what opinion other people may have.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I for one feel like dancing.

    I, for one, feel like dancing.

    Is setting off for one with commas preferred in formal writing? That's the impression I have but I am not certain. A search of googlebooks turned up plentiful examples of both I for one and I, for one,. Are there are any rules/guidelines that are the basis for which is used?

    Passau
    I think - broadly speaking - commas tend to reflect slight pauses in speech. You can say "I for one feel like dancing" with very little pause or you can say "I, for one, feel like dancing" with pauses either side of the "for one" and in this case it is more stressed. I don't think that either spelling would shock my eye on reading them.

    Edit - just realised that this is a resurrected thread with a slightly different question. I would say that "I for one" effectively mean "as for me", "for my part", "as far as I'm concerned" or similar.
     
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