I forbid you / I'm forbidding you

Poland91pl

Senior Member
Polish
Hello. It's" forbid" a stative verb?

Suppose I am talking to my friend who wants to use my car. I don't want him to what do I say ""you mustn't use my car, I forbid you to use my car/ I'm forbidding you to use my car!"
 
  • SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    It depends on the situation. If he threatens to use it without your permission, then "I forbid you ..." may be appropriate.

    But in most cases, you would simply say "No, you can't use it".
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Forbid" is a rather forceful verb, as SwissPete says. If you were to use it, then "I forbid you" is the usual expression.

    "I'm forbidding you" is rare, and would only be used after some time discussing or arguing about the matter. Perhaps if the other person had failed to grasp your opposition to their using your car, you might say something like "Look, I'm forbidding you to use my car, right!". I am not sure whether the continuous form is used for emphasis, or because by the time you come to use it, the discussion has been going on for some time so might be regarded as a continuous action, but either way this usage is unusual.

    "You mustn't use my car" has a similar meaning to "I forbid you to use my car", but is used in a wider range of circumstances. You might say "You mustn't" when the other person had made no suggestion of doing the thing, but "I forbid" is always in response to a threatened action.
     

    Poland91pl

    Senior Member
    Polish
    "Forbid" is a rather forceful verb, as SwissPete says. If you were to use it, then "I forbid you" is the usual expression.

    "I'm forbidding you" is rare, and would only be used after some time discussing or arguing about the matter. Perhaps if the other person had failed to grasp your opposition to their using your car, you might say something like "Look, I'm forbidding you to use my car, right!". I am not sure whether the continuous form is used for emphasis, or because by the time you come to use it, the discussion has been going on for some time so might be regarded as a continuous action, but either way this usage is unusual.

    "You mustn't use my car" has a similar meaning to "I forbid you to use my car", but is used in a wider range of circumstances. You might say "You mustn't" when the other person had made no suggestion of doing the thing, but "I forbid" is always in response to a threatened action.
    Is "mustn't " used in everyday speech ?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    A little more background might help.

    What does your friend actually say to you? Can I drive your car for a few minutes (with you in the passenger seat)? Or: Can I borrow your car for a couple of hours? Or: Can I keep your car with me next week while you're out of town?

    And why do you not want him to use your car? Is it because (a) you don't like lending your car, or (b) your friend's a bad driver or (c) you need the car yourself, or something else?

    All these things can make a difference. The relationship between you and your friend also makes a difference. I once heard someone I know saying to someone who wanted to try out his car: I'm nit letting you drive my car. I've seen how you drive. With someone he had a more formal relationship with, he might have said: I don't usually lend my car to anyone.
     
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