''I gave it up'' Vs ''I quit it''

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Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

Which of the options is idiomatic/common in the contexts below? If neither, what do you suggest? Please take a look.


1.

John: Tell me about your English course. You were excited about learning English. You said it was one of your dreams.
Jake: Well, I gave it up.

2.

John: Tell me about your English course. You were excited about learning English. You said it was one of your dreams.
Jake: Well, I quit it.


Meaning intended: I no longer want it, it is not part of my plans anymore, I stopped.


Thank you in advance!
 
  • George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    One needs to say something like "I no longer wanted to do the course, so I quit". A reason followed by a solution...

    GF..

    The two examples in post 1 just say I stopped: no reason for stopping is given.
    It is possibly implied in the 2 examples.. But that depends on context they were spoken in.
     

    Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    So, I've concluded, after your answer, I should rewrite it:

    1.

    John: Tell me about your English course. You were excited about learning English. You said it was one of your dreams.
    Jake: Well, I gave it up. I'm too busy these days and I don't have enough time to study English.

    2.

    John: Tell me about your English course. You were excited about learning English. You said it was one of your dreams.
    Jake: Well, I quit it. I'm too busy these days and I don't have enough time to study English.


    Thank you for your answer!
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Both of these are correct. "I gave it up" sounds British. Though Americans would understand it, they'd be more likely to say "I gave up on it" or simply "I quit it." Other expressions are "I dropped it," or "I dropped out of it."
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Hi,

    Yesterday I heard a piece of news on TV and it was showed in a video. Someone (perhaps the man's wife) told a man that his son had just fallen from the stairs and the man said:

    Well, quit it!

    What does that mean?

    I am pretty sure he said that because I also saw the subtitle, unless the subtitle is wrong and my grasp of spoken English is so bad!
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Hi,

    Yesterday I heard a piece of news on TV and it was showed in a video. Someone (perhaps the man's wife) told a man that his son had just fallen from the stairs and the man said:

    Well, quit it!

    What does that mean?

    I am pretty sure he said that because I also saw the subtitle, unless the subtitle is wrong and my grasp of spoken English is so bad!
    Whoever said it has no grasp of spoken English. Or the sub-title was wrong. :D

    GF..

    Now that's a bit tortuous....
     
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