I give you a cake to deliver to my friends [use of to]

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bollarin

New Member
thai
"I give you a cake and you deliver it to my friends" has same meaning of "I give you a cake to deliver to my friends." ?
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    There is a slight difference in meaning.

    "I give you a cake and you deliver it to my friends" means "I (habitually) give you a cake, and you (habitually) deliver it to my friends." It does not necessarily mean that I want you to deliver the cake to my friends; only that that's is what you do with it.

    "I give you a cake to deliver to my friends" means "I (habitually) give you a cake that I want you to deliver it to my friends." It does not necessarily mean that you actually deliver the cake to my friends
     

    bollarin

    New Member
    thai
    Thank you Florentina and i have a question to know if i learned it or not;
    Would you say that the following sentence is true or not?
    "I will call you to give an information about latest news." Does it mean that you actually give an information to me about what i want (le.g. latest news)?
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    "Information" is not countable; don't use "an" with it.

    It means that your present intention is to call, and to give information about the latest news. We don't know if you'll actually do it; the call hasn't happened yet. (Edit: Your sentence says that the speaker is giving the information. I'm not sure based on your post if you understood that.)
     

    bollarin

    New Member
    thai
    thank you so much pob. well, i want to join the following 2 sentences in one;
    -->1) i will call you. 2) you give information(i will not give information)

    i want to make you give information to me when i call. how can i say that?
     

    bollarin

    New Member
    thai
    As a result of what you told me, i have a question;

    Do the following two sentences have the same meaning?
    "I called him to help us" and "I called him. I wanted him to help us."
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    The meaning is almost the same.

    "I called him to help us" definitively states that you asked him to help, while the following is possible with your other option:

    "I called him. I wanted him to help us. When he told me that he had had broken his leg yesterday, however, I didn't even bother asking him"
     
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