" I go to Ballys twice a week"

roniy

Senior Member
ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
" I go to Ballys twice a week"

'Bally' is a brand name of a famous gym chain in the US.

But I always hear people say " I go to Ballys twice a week"

Why with 's' ?

Let's say I go to Roni's house, I would say : "I go to Roni"


Can someone clear this up for me ?

THanks.
 
  • anothersmith

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    I am a member of that gym. Its name is "Bally." We say "I'm going to Bally's" the same way we say "I'm going to John's" (which means "I'm going to John's house"). It's just slang.
     

    expenseroso

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    People are always looking for a way to shorten nouns; using a possessive like that is a convenient way to do so. You'll hear that sort of thing alot with any common destination that sound's OK turned into a possessive ("Eckerd's" (Eckerd Pharmacy), "Sonic's" (Sonic Drive-In), etc, etc).
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    There is a tendency to add an "s" to the name of an establishment, especially if it is a personal name, although it's a possessive, an apostrophe is not always used, it's a kind of special case (apostrophes are often dropped in place and street names, too).

    Sometimes the business owner uses the form as their official style, sometimes they resist the popularization. I recall that F W Woolworth & Co has always been called "Woolworth's" popularly, but the company originally insisted on calling themselves "Woolworth" in their adverts. In the end they gave up and called themselves "Woolworth's" too. The large pharmacy chain Boots was founded by a family named Boot, but uses the possessive without an apostrophe. Some members of the public seem not to be satisfied with this, as you sometimes hear the double possessive, Boots's!

    Another example is local nightclubs in the UK, they almost always end in a possessive "s" even when it would seem inappropriate to the actual name.
     

    Haylette

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    I've noticed that the shops Tesco, Asda, and Jarrold always seem to acquire an 's when people talk about them for the reasons mentioned above.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Yes Marks & Spencer is a good one. I think they also resisted the popular possessive. My mother used to call them "Marks", but I don't know if it had an apostrophe or not, or where it was put! Now they call themselves M&S it seems.

    People who consider themselves down to earth feel that not adding the "s" sounds pretentious. "I'm going to Marks & Spencer." "Please, get over yourself, nobody calls it that!"
     
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