I <got out of / left / headed out> the house at 9 A.M., and I got here 5 minutes ago.

Discussion in 'English Only' started by jihoon, Mar 10, 2016.

  1. jihoon Senior Member

    korean
    1. I got out of the house at 9 A.M., and I got here 5 minutes ago.

    2. I left the home at 9 A.M., and I got here 5 minutes ago.

    3. I headed out the door at 9 A.M., and I got here 5 minutes ago.


    Which one is more common than the others?
     
  2. dermott

    dermott Senior Member

    Castiglion Fiorentino, Italy
    B.E. via Australian English
    I left home at 9 A.M. and got here 5 minutes ago.

    I headed out the door at 9 A.M. and got here 5 minutes ago.
     
  3. Franco-filly Senior Member

    Southern England
    English - Southern England
    None are particularly idiomatic. I would say "I left home / I left the house at 9a.m and arrived/got here 5 minutes ago.
     
  4. Aardvark01

    Aardvark01 Senior Member

    Midlands, England
    British English (Midlands)
    Having begun with "I" there is no need to repeat it.
    We avoid repetition where we can, so 3. "I headed out..." is better because it does not repeat "got"
    An alternative would be:

    "I set out [from the house/from home] at 9am and got here 5 minutes ago."

    Note - "the home" suggests an institution, such as nursing home or an orphanage.
     
  5. velisarius

    velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    "I got out of the house..." - it sounds as though it was difficult to get away. Perhaps you were delayed by phone calls, or you were rather late getting yourself organised that morning.

    "Headed out the door..." - it sounds a little strange to me if you are describing a routine departure from home. Maybe you were upset and made a rush for the door, or anyway you left hurriedly :). We usually talk about being headed for (towards) a destination: I left home and headed for the train station.

    "I left home..." sounds neutral, unlike the other two versions.
     
  6. Edinburgher Senior Member

    Scotland
    German/English bilingual
    "I left home" carries a slight hint of a permanent departure (such as when you're moving out of the parental home into a place of your own, for example: "He didn't leave home until he was 38"). Unless context clearly excludes that possibility (and probably otherwise too), I'd say "I left the house".
     
  7. velisarius

    velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    I have no qualms about saying: "I left home this morning at 9 o'clock." I don't think they would send out a search party if I said it on the phone.:D
     
  8. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    In some contexts it might, Edinburgher, but it doesn't for me in the OP's sentence.
     

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