I had <been working> for a very bad company when

JJXR

Senior Member
Russian
Hello to all,

Thanks for reading my post.


Context:

I like my new job. Earlier, I worked for a very bad company and didn't like working there (I quit that job). I say the sentence below.

Sample sentence:

On November 10, I was out of work. I had been working for a very bad company when I met my present boss. He offered me my current job. I started working for the new company on November 20. Today is October 5. I like my new job, and I like my present boss.

Interpretation in terms of the order of events:

Interpretation #1:

1. I quit my old job.
2. I was unemployed when I met my present boss.
3. I started working for the company my present boss works for.

Interpretation #2:

1. I was still working for the bad company when I met my present boss.
2. I quit my old job.
3. I started working for the company my present boss works for.

Question:

Does "had been working" imply that I was still working for the very bad company when I met my present boss, or does it imply that I was no longer working there when I met him?

I think both interpretations are possible. The sample sentence is ambiguous in that respect.

Edited: "October 5" should be "December 5."


Thanks a lot for any comments, corrections or suggestions!

Regards,
JJXR
 
Last edited:
  • Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    Does "had been working" imply that I was still working for the very bad company when I met my present boss
    Yes, that's how I read it, which confused me having read the prior sentence.

    Also you need to put the years on the dates otherwise you've been in your new job (October) since before you left the other (Nov.) :confused:
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top