I had bought a connection in the Paddington district.

xuliang

Senior Member
Chinese Mandarin
I was reading the short story "The stock-broker's clerk" by Arthur Conan-Doyle. The sentence below is the first sentence of the story:

"Shortly after my marriage I had bought a connection in the Paddington districe. Old Mr Farquhar, from whom I purchased it, had at one time an excellent general practice. " Then contents followed is Holmes came to see "me" and invited "me" to see a case.

I looked up the word "connection ", but haven't found this usage. I am wondering if it's a usage that is old fashioned.

Thank you.
 
Last edited:
  • london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    You must always quote your source. It is obvious to me that this is a short story by Arthur Conan-Doyle, but it is not necessarily obvious to everyone. Anyway, I think he means he bought/took over the practice (a medical pratice) from Mr. Farquhar.
     

    xuliang

    Senior Member
    Chinese Mandarin
    You must always quote your source. It is obvious to me that this is a short story by Arthur Conan-Doyle, but it is not necessarily obvious to everyone. Anyway, I think he means he bought/took over the practice (a medical pratice) from Mr. Farquhar.
    Hi, Thank you. I just added this information. I don't know why "connection" can deliver the meaning here.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Interestingly, the term "connection" has a specific meaning in modern-day medical practice in the UK. All doctors working within the Approved Practice Settings scheme must hold and maintain a "prescribed connection" to a designated body. This is a General Medical Council requirement, and the terminology may well date back to an earlier era. The GMC was established in 1858, and Conan Doyle wrote The Adventure of the Stockbroker's Clerk in 1893, so it may be that Dr Watson's "connection" had a similar significance: a medical practice regulated by the General Medical Council.

    By the way, it's Arthur Conan Doyle (not Conan-Doyle). Conan is one of his given names, not part of his surname. Even though many people came to think of Conan Doyle as a compound surname, it was (and is) never written with a hyphen.

    Ws
     
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