I had butterflies in stomach before my Thesis Defense Session

supermarioutd

Senior Member
Persian
Hello to all

Is there a specific term for the session on which a Masters student defends his thesis?

Is this sentence correct and natural? :

I had butterflies in my stomach before my thesis defense session.

Thank you in advance
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Is there a specific term for the session on which a Masters student defends his thesis?
    In the UK1, it is known as a viva-voce. This is a Latin phrase: see viva voce - WordReference.com Dictionary of English for the pronunciation. Usually/informally, it is referred to as a viva/my viva/the viva, etc. (i.e. omitting 'voce'.)

    I had butterflies in my stomach before my viva[-voce].


    1 You should wait for an AE speaker to comment.
     
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    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    In the UK1, it is known as a viva-voce. This is a Latin phrase: see viva voce - WordReference.com Dictionary of English for the pronunciation. Usually/informally, it is referred to as a viva/my viva/the viva, etc. (i.e. omitting 'voce'.)

    I had butterflies in my stomach before my viva[-voce].


    1 You should wait for an AE speaker to comment.
    Thanks a lot man. How commonly is viva voce used? Because in the dictionary it is defined as "a spoken examination for a college qualification". Is it specifically used for defending one's thesis or is it a general term?
    Is it possible that I say this to a British or Australian native speaker and they don't understand it?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Thanks a lot man. How commonly is viva-voce used?
    Very commonly. (As I say, it is usually shortened to "viva" except when used formally.)
    Because it is not in the dictionary.
    Get a better dictionary! :D
    Is it possible that I could say this to a British or Australian [I cannot speak for Australians] native speaker without their understanding it?
    Anything is possible... However, if you are talking about educational matters at a university, they should understand it. It is not as rare as you seem to think it is.
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Very commonly. (As I say, it is usually shortened to "viva" except when used formally.)
    Get a better dictionary! :D
    Anything is possible... However, if you are talking about educational matters at a university, they should understand it. It is not as rare as you seem to think it is.
    I edited my post as I found it in the dictionary. But it is defined as "a spoken examination for a college qualification" and nothing is mentioned specifically about "defending thesis".
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    To add: https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1169164.pdf <- this is from Sydney University (Australia) - viva-voce is used in Australia.
    I edited my post as I found it in the dictionary. But it is defined as "a spoken examination for a college qualification" and nothing is mentioned specifically about "defending thesis".
    You still have not found a good dictionary. Stop worrying! Viva-voce is correct.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Because, (i) viva-voce, in English, means ‘by or with the living voice’ (ii) viva-voce refers only to a spoken defence.

    PS:
    Please do not use "man" as a form of address - you sound as if you have escaped from the 1970s in a time machine - man is now embarrassingly old-fashioned.
     
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