I hate you.

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msantiago

Senior Member
USA, English
Ciao a tutti - I need your assistance.

How do you say: I hate you and never want to speak to you again!

Grazie!
 
  • Idioteque

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    msantiago said:
    Ciao a tutti - I need your assistance.

    How do you say: I hate you and never want to speak to you again!

    Grazie!
    Ciao!

    "Ti odio, e non intendo rivolgerti mai più la parola!" ;)
     

    Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    acceptable, but better
    ti odio e non ti parlerò mai più....

    maybe a 6 years old child (and a 35 years old grown up big child or a 37 y.o. grown up girl) would say
    ti odio e non ti parlo più... gnè gnè gnè(making faces)
     

    Tommaso Gastaldi

    Senior Member
    Italian, ITALY
    :)
    If you don't put there the lover's name, you can always reuse it...

    carrickp said:
    Quest'è la ragione per non tatuarsi (colle) parole d'amore.
    PS
    I have never seen Quest'è, but I am not sure it's wrong :confused:
     

    msantiago

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Grazie mille. I knew "I hate you" is "ti odio" it's like Spanish. Anyhow, the reason I asked for a translation of this phrase is because a couple of guys at my office were trying to say things in different languages. They were just having fun. They asked me because I speak Spanish and po' l'italiano and peu de francais. (Pardon my grammar)

    Buon fine settimana
     

    Andre Balian

    Senior Member
    English, uSA
    msantiago said:
    Grazie mille. I knew "I hate you" is "ti odio" it's like Spanish. Anyhow, the reason I asked for a translation of this phrase is because a couple of guys at my office were trying to say things in different languages. They were just having fun. They asked me because I speak Spanish and un po' d'italiano and un peu de francais. (Pardon my grammar)

    Buon fine settimana
    Francais needs the little hook on the C but I can't remember how to make it. :(
     

    DAH

    Senior Member
    USA/California--English
    Tommaso Gastaldi said:
    :)
    If you don't put there the lover's name, you can always reuse it...
    PS
    I have never seen Quest'è, but I am not sure it's wrong :confused:
    T, sono sicura che qual e' = quale ma non credo che esista quest'e'.
     

    quita

    Senior Member
    italy, italian
    Quest'è is not a mistake. It is a contraction of 'Questo/a è'. Anyway I wouldn't use it in a formal text.

    Cheers
    Frankly i've never heard 'quest'è', and never read it anywhere as well.... However, i wouldn't say it's a mistake, it is possible it is an archaic form, and i'm sure it is comprehensible to native speakers.
     

    ericamxpt01

    New Member
    italia
    Ti odio, e non ti parlerò mai più.
    But if you want to be more impressive you can say:
    Ti odio e manco a morire ti rivolgerò la parola.

    That means that even if i'm going to die i'll not talk to you..
     

    dylanG3893

    Senior Member
    CA
    United States
    Quest'è is not a mistake. It is a contraction of 'Questo/a è'. Anyway I wouldn't use it in a formal text.

    Cheers
    CHE COSA!? Sono detto qui che non si dice mai 'Quest'è'. Forse suonerebbe così, ma sono detto che non si nè scrive nè dice.

    Forse sono sbagliato...
     

    dylanG3893

    Senior Member
    CA
    United States
    Intendevi dire "ho detto" ? Se no, perché hai detto "sono detto" ? Non capisco..
    Hah, perché in inglese significa qualcosa di differente.... ho sbagliato. Forse è meglio dire "Qui ho imparato che non va bene nè dire nè scrivere "Quest'è".
     

    Lorena1970

    Banned
    Italy, Italiano
    Hi everybody,

    My question is: how strong and offensive could be using the word HATE in love contexts? i.e.: is it really bad and rude to say "I hate you!" to one's lover while arguing or after a particularly disappointing and nervous discussion, or it is accetable and forgivable ? I mean: how rude, offensive and definitive can consider it a British native ? In Italian it's a very strong word, but I have the feeling that in English is less bad and not so extreme. Am I wrong?

    Many thanks indeed!

    Lo
     

    fenfen1144

    Member
    America and English
    Hello Lorena. In English, "hate" is thrown around quite a bit. Growing up I was told not to use the word because of "how strong it was" but I hear it used very often (I hate doing my homework, I hate getting up early, etc). However, if two lovers were arguing and one of them said "I hate you!" it would be very very strong, in my opinion. Like most things, it just depends on context. Spero che la mia spiegazione sia utile!
     

    Lorena1970

    Banned
    Italy, Italiano
    Hello Lorena. In English, "hate" is thrown around quite a bit. Growing up I was told not to use the word because of "how strong it was" but I hear it used very often (I hate doing my homework, I hate getting up early, etc). However, if two lovers were arguing and one of them said "I hate you!" it would be very very strong, in my opinion. Like most things, it just depends on context. Spero che la mia spiegazione sia utile!
    Sì, molto utile!
    Thanks a lot

    Lo:)
     

    fenfen1144

    Member
    America and English
    Ciao!

    "Ti odio, e non intendo rivolgerti mai più la parola!" ;)

    I thought that "mai" and "più " had to come after the first verb:

    Ti odio, e non intendo mai più rivolgerti la parola!

    Can "mai" and "più" encapsulate two verbs as well or only in special cases?
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Yes, odio is a strong word, but love creates a volatile context. Consider the lyric from the song Malafemmena:

    Femmena,
    tu si 'a cchiù bella femmena,
    te voglio bene e t'odio
    nun te pozzo scurdà...

    Speaking of Napulità, I would never expect to hear quest'è in that Italian language either. The proper form is ghist'è.
    .
     

    aronnax5

    New Member
    Italian
    Quest'è is not a mistake. It is a contraction of 'Questo/a è'. Anyway I wouldn't use it in a formal text.

    Cheers
    In italiano non si contraggono le vocali che non sono uguali tra due parole adiacenti.
    Mi spiego:
    Quale è ---> Qual è corretto
    Quest'è non esiste!
     

    ectropion

    Senior Member
    Non sarei così categorica:

    Quest’è la giovanetta ch’Amor guida,
    ch’entra per li occhi a ciascun che la vede;
    quest’è la donna piena di merzede,
    in cui ogne vertù bella si fida
    (Dino Frescobaldi, Rime)

    Qual è non c'entra nulla. E' un caso di troncamento

    Poi, da Wikipedia:
    Ecco le principali parole che si possono elidere:
    Lo, la (articoli o pronomi); una e composti; questo, questa; quello, quella: L'albero, l'upupa, l'ho vista; un'antica via, nessun'altra; quest’orso, quest’alunna (le forme plurali [gli, le, questi…], invece, non s’elidono mai)
     
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