I have a pet parrot [to mock] me.

< Previous | Next >

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The following is of my own making.
I have a pet parrot to mock me.

I know to-infinitive refers to the current time, not a future time when it qualifies the superlative degree or an ordinal number, but I don't know if to-infinitive can refer to the current time in different cases as well.
So I'd like to know #1 is idiomatic.
 
Last edited:
  • park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, london calling, for your answer.
    Then how about "I think Sue is a girl to abide by school rules all the time?"
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The following is of my own making.
    I have a pet parrot to mock me.

    I know to-infinitive refers to the current time, not a future time when it qualifies the superlative degree or an ordinal number, but I don't know if to-infinitive can refer to the current time in a different cases as well.
    So I'd like to know #1 is idiomatic.
    (1) The sentence "I have a pet parrot to mock me." is grammatically correct and idiomatic.
    (2) To mock someone means to make them look foolish. The sentence means "I have a pet parrot to make a fool of me."
    (3) It's possible that you mean, "I have a pet parrot to imitate me."

    To answer your question:

    "I have a parrot to mock me" can have two meanings according to context.

    1. Look here John, I don't need you to make fun of me - I already have a pet parrot to mock me!
    2. I'm quite conceited. To keep myself humble I have a pet parrot to mock me and keep me in my place.

    In any case it refers to the present, i.e. "I currently own a pet parrot and its purpose/intention is to mock me."
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    This doen't work either. I don't know what you are trying to say with this infinitive construction. Perhaps you could explain your intention clearly.
    'He's a man to be feared' would mean he's somebody whom we need to fear.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Chasint and Hermione Golightly" for your answer.
    Perhaps you could explain your intention clearly.
    I'd like to know if to-infinitive can refer to the current time exclude the case to-infinitive qualifies the superlative degree or an ordinal number.

    How about this "she's the type to be precise about everything."?
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Barque, for your answer.
    Then I'd like to know if to-infinitive can't mean "who is" exclude the case to-infinitive qualifies the superlative degree or an ordinal number.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Chanist, for your continuing support.
    You have continuously confirmed my own examples, but the others have not.
    So I am confused now.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Then I'd like to know if to-infinitive can't mean "who is" exclude the case to-infinitive qualifies the superlative degree or an ordinal number.
    I'm afraid I haven't followed your question, Sang Joon. Could you please put it in different words, or maybe give us an example of what you mean?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Thank you, Chanist, for your continuing support.
    You have continuously confirmed my own examples, but the others have not.
    So I am confused now.
    Chanist has confirmed that your sentence means something. It does not mean "I have a pet parrot which mocks me." which, based on your other examples, is what you intend.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Myridon, for your reply.
    I'm afraid I haven't followed your question, Sang Joon. Could you please put it in different words, or maybe give us an example of what you mean?
    Mike is the only one to help me.
    Here, "to help" means "who help," not "who will help."
    But to-infinitive modifies "the only" and it is one of the exceptions.
    So It is not what I have searched for.

    I'd like to know if you can come up with a sentence where "to do" can be replaced with "who is."
    If not, I won't think to-infinitive can refer to the current time.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top