I have a question of you.

< Previous | Next >
Hello!
If we want say I HAVE A QUESTION OF YOU what are idiomatic ways?
  • I have a question of you.
  • I have a question from you.
  • I have a question to you.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    • I have a question of you. :cross:
    • I have a question from you. :tick: But this means 'You have given me a question to answer'.
    • I have a question to you. :cross:
    I have a question for you. :tick: I think this is what you are trying to say.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's not quite clear what you mean. Do you want to ask somebody a question?
    You can say "I have a question for you" but I suggest that "May I ask you a question?" is more likely. It does depend who you are talking to and the circumstances. That's what we call context. We need to know the context to give you the best answer.
     
    @heypresto I HAVE A QUESTION FROM YOU means I ASKED QUESTION BEFORE. NOW I WANT ANSWER?

    @Hermione Golightly , In some contexts this question can be ask.
    • I am talking to my friend, I have a question for you, Tomas. (Tomas) What is? (I) Where were you yesterday?....
    • (In a group of teachers, I have you (teacher Honza) a question? Ask please.....
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top