I have been shopping

slovac

Senior Member
Could I ask? I don't remmeber that sentence exactly, because I saw in a far past. I was looking for it, but I was not successful. But I would like to ask on it. It was situation that there was used present perfect in sense that some activy was done before a moment of present. It was expressed by present perfect continous because test's author wanted to express that activy lasted for a time period.
There is situation how I remmembered it:
There was a question: What are you doing here?(in supermarket)
Answer: I have been shopping, now I am sitting.
Could I ask if I can use present perfect continous when I have situation I have done something before moment of present, it lasted for a time period, I want to mention that it lasted the time period but it is finished activity?
I have been shopping for 2 hours, now I am sitting.
Before now, I've only heart that I have been shopping for 2 hours. means: I have been shopping from 2 hours ago but STILL I am doing it.
Thank you.
 
  • Hau Ruck

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    What this sentence means is, "I have been shopping from two hours ago, until this moment, and now I will start sitting."

    "Now I am sitting" is a bit idiomatic. It can mean that the speaker is actually sitting as they speak, but it can also mean "I am about to start sitting".
     

    slovac

    Senior Member
    Please and can't I use it in this sentence?
    I have been shopping, now I will start sitting.
    But I have been shopping since 5 p.m. till 7 p.m., from 7 p.m. till 9 p.m. I have been doing something else(not mentioned) and at 9 p.m. I will start sitting.
    Thank you.
     

    slovac

    Senior Member
    If I can use present perfect when I don't fulfill condition: until this moment. I was doing some activy before now. But between this activity(name it number 1) and now was other activity(name it number 2). I was doing some activy 1 then other activy 2 and then I am in present.
    Could I say? I have been shopping(activity 1),now I am sitting.
    I was doing shopping from 5 p.m. till 7 p.m. and now it is 9 p.m.
    Thank you.
     

    ambitia

    New Member
    German
    What would have been the intention if Billy Joel had sung:Victor was born in spring of 44, he's never seen his father anymore "instead of saw?
     

    abluter

    Senior Member
    British English
    I suppose, ambitia, that means he has never seen his father since the spring of 1944.
     

    ambitia

    New Member
    German
    So do I. But maybe it's treated as a period in the past, so that after requires the Simple Past.
     

    abluter

    Senior Member
    British English
    Oh, I see; yes, you could say "Victor was born in the spring of 44; he never saw his father anymore".
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    In the context of the song, it means he never saw his father again, after 1944.

    ...he never saw his father anymore.

    He's never seen his father -
    he's never seen his father in his life.
    He hasn't seen his father anymore, since 1944.

    It seems that when we use both never and anymore, the present perfect is unnatural. They point to a past time period that finished in the past.
     

    ambitia

    New Member
    German
    Thought so. To me, after sounds more natural with the Past Simple. But what kinda period that finished in the past are you referring to?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Well, when we use "since", we refer to a time period that began at a point in the past and continued until the present time.

    He never saw his father again. (There is no indication that he might see him in the future. Perhaps "he"or the father is dead.)

    He hasn't seen his father since 1944. (There's an open possibility that he will see him again at some future time.)

    He's never seen his father. (Again, it's possible that he will see him someday.)
     

    ambitia

    New Member
    German
    That's quite natural but did you have a special kind of period in mind when you told me, they point to such one?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    That's quite natural but did you have a special kind of period in mind when you told me, they point to such one?
    Victor was born in the spring of '44. He never saw his father any more. Presumably the last time Victor saw his father was when he was a newborn baby, and the father didn't return. It was a few days or, at most, a period of a few months that Victor saw his father (of course a small baby could not have known that it was his father, so in fact he never knew him at all). The episode belongs entirely to the past, so we don't use the present perfect there.
     

    ambitia

    New Member
    German
    Your words make me wanna blubber, so sad. War is such a dreadful traitor. Thank you for giving me such a good aid. Love, ambitia
     
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